Liberty in the Age of Terror: A Defence of Civil Society and Enlightenment Values

AC Grayling

Liberty in the Age of Terror: A Defence of Civil Society and Enlightenment Values

According to Anthony Grayling, our societies are under attack not only from the threat of terrorism, but also from our governments' attempts to fight that threat by reducing freedom in our own societies. As examples he cites the 42-day detention controversy, CCTV surveillance, increasing invasion of privacy, ID Cards, as well as Abu Ghraib, rendition, Guantanamo... In this book Grayling sets out what's at risk, engages with the arguments for and against examining the cases made by Isaiah Berlin and Ronald Dworkin on the one hand, and Roger Scruton and John Gray on the other, and finally proposes a different way to respond that makes defending the civil liberties on which western society is founded the cornerstone for defeating terrorism. 3.7 out of 5 based on 3 reviews
Liberty in the Age of Terror: A Defence of Civil Society and Enlightenment Values

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre Society, Politics & Philosophy
Format Paperback
Pages 304
RRP £12.99
Date of Publication June 2009
ISBN 978-1408802427
Publisher Bloomsbury
 

According to Anthony Grayling, our societies are under attack not only from the threat of terrorism, but also from our governments' attempts to fight that threat by reducing freedom in our own societies. As examples he cites the 42-day detention controversy, CCTV surveillance, increasing invasion of privacy, ID Cards, as well as Abu Ghraib, rendition, Guantanamo... In this book Grayling sets out what's at risk, engages with the arguments for and against examining the cases made by Isaiah Berlin and Ronald Dworkin on the one hand, and Roger Scruton and John Gray on the other, and finally proposes a different way to respond that makes defending the civil liberties on which western society is founded the cornerstone for defeating terrorism.

Reviews

The Economist

The Economist

This is a timely and invigorating call to arms. But whereas Mr Grayling does not exaggerate the threats to liberty, he makes too little of the growing resistance to them.

18/06/2009

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The Times

Mick Hume

This is a welcome change from the illiberal liberalism of the new Labour age, which always sees another ban or restriction as the solution. Yet even the liberal professor could have been bolder in defence of his principles.

20/06/2009

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Scotland on Sunday

Marc Lambert

Despite the great importance of its subject, Grayling's book has a hurried, incomplete feel to it. It lacks fluency and uncomfortably compresses complicated arguments. To bulk it out, he has added brief sections on thinkers he both admires and despises, from Isaiah Berlin to Slavoj Zizek, doing both them and us a considerable disservice. Grayling argues, rightly, that liberty and its discontents is the central issue of our age. But he could have done better than this.

21/06/2009

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