The Small Hand

Susan Hill

The Small Hand

The chilling tale of a man in the grip of a small, invisible hand… A ghosly novella by the author of The Woman in Black and The Man in the Picture, to be read by the fire on a cold winter’s night. 3.8 out of 5 based on 8 reviews
The Small Hand

Omniscore:

Classification Fiction
Genre General Fiction, Horror & Ghost Stories
Format Hardback
Pages 176
RRP £9.99
Date of Publication September 2010
ISBN 978-1846682360
Publisher Profile
 

The chilling tale of a man in the grip of a small, invisible hand… A ghosly novella by the author of The Woman in Black and The Man in the Picture, to be read by the fire on a cold winter’s night.

Reviews

The Guardian

Jeremy Dyson

The all-important atmosphere is beautifully evoked... But what's most impressive is what hangs between the spare lines of Hill's precise prose – particularly in the book's denouement. Ultimately, this is a wonderful piece of storytelling that does what a good story ought to do: it keeps you guessing, pulls you in. And when the climax comes, the explanation and the source of the haunting are not what you think at all. You really don't see it coming.

25/09/2010

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The Independent

Arifa Akbar

While Hill's ghostly tropes are recognisable - the purgatorial child spirit, the dilapidated house, an order of silent monks in the Appalachians, an unassuming bachelor - they are rendered skilfully enough to chill spines, or at least to bring about some breathlessness.

01/10/2010

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The Scotsman

Lesley MacDowell

Hill's superbly crafted tale doesn't belong to a confessional age, but it does belong to an age where we are all striving for our own identity. Where we all, secretly, long for a ghost to reach out and grip us, make us real.

26/09/2010

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The Spectator

Andrew Taylor

This beautifully written novel may be short, but not a word is wasted… highly recommended for a chilly autumn evening by the fire.

11/09/2010

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The Financial Times

Suzi Feay

...another brilliant exercise in the uncanny... if the book has a fault, it is that everything is rather too tidily tied up at the end. I prefer to be left with a bit of ambiguity, but this is an elegant entertainment for a winter’s night.

30/10/2010

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The Literary Review

John Harwood

The scenes at The White House are the most compelling, and Hill’s decision to locate most of the action away from her principal setting means that it cannot match the brooding power of Eel Marsh House. Adam Snow, too, seems insubstantial alongside Arthur Kipps, if only because we learn so little about him – though to be fair, The Small Hand, at 167 generously set pages, is only half the length of The Woman in Black. But even though the ghost of Jennet Humfrye remains her most malign creation to date, Susan Hill is amongst the finest exponents of the traditional ghost story, and I look forward to her next one.

01/10/2010

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The New Statesman

Olivia Laing

For a ghost story to be successful, it is not only the ghost that should be veiled; the narrator should also employ a modicum of discretion. But Snow's need to repeat again and again quite how terrifying his experience has become makes it increasingly hard for the reader to find his haunting credible... Where The Small Hand does spark up is in a tricksy denouement

19/10/2010

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The Sunday Times

Joan Smith

...The Small Hand exists in a version of the modern world that doesn’t quite feel convincing, and Hill has to keep up the eerie atmosphere by reminding the reader that events are tending towards a tragic denouement. By definition ghost stories deal in the unexplained, but this one leaves too little to the imagination.

26/09/2010

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