The Death of Eli Gold

David Baddiel

The Death of Eli Gold

In New York's Mt. Sinai hospital, the world's greatest living writer, Eli Gold, is dying. Witnessing his death are his precocious 8-year-old daughter by his present (fifth) wife, his anxiety-ridden 44-year-old son from his third marriage, and his 89-year-old first wife, watching on TV from a care home in London. And also, secretly, his fourth wife's fundamentalist Mormon brother, who has never got over his sister's death in a suicide pact with Eli, a suicide pact that he, Eli, survived. 3.1 out of 5 based on 5 reviews
The Death of Eli Gold

Omniscore:

Classification Fiction
Genre General
Format Hardcover
Pages 416
RRP £18.99
Date of Publication March 2011
ISBN 978-0007270835
Publisher Fourth Estate
 

In New York's Mt. Sinai hospital, the world's greatest living writer, Eli Gold, is dying. Witnessing his death are his precocious 8-year-old daughter by his present (fifth) wife, his anxiety-ridden 44-year-old son from his third marriage, and his 89-year-old first wife, watching on TV from a care home in London. And also, secretly, his fourth wife's fundamentalist Mormon brother, who has never got over his sister's death in a suicide pact with Eli, a suicide pact that he, Eli, survived.

Reviews

The Times

Melissa Katsoulis

Fans of Baddiel’s television repartee will enjoy the trademark whingey-witty observations about airports, retro sweets and lap dancers. Those who care to read between the one-liners will hear a more serious voice emerge: a maturing writer who may, with his next novel, be ready to throw off his English reserve and dare to attempt a redefinition of the Great Novel himself. Let’s hope that he is, because this, his grown-up, fluent and bitingly bright fourth book, is shockingly good.

05/03/2011

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The Independent

Mark Sellek

With the humour turned back on, this is by far his most entertaining and satisfying novel. The dénouement involving the Mormon is well earnt and exquisitely crafted.

27/02/2011

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The Daily Telegraph

Leo Robson

The Death of Eli Gold exhibits Baddiel’s impressive strengths as well as the flaws that threaten to undermine them. He writes fluid and amusing prose, but he also succumbs to the stand-up’s vices of smugness and glibness. The novel strives to resemble Jonathan Franzen – the author of one of its epigraphs – but the effect is closer to Jonathan Coe.

04/03/2011

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The Guardian

Steven Poole

Caricature can sometimes be justified by a cruel brilliance of style. It isn't here.

05/03/2011

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Times Literary Supplement

Matthew Adams

Ascribing to each character a distinct narrative voice, the novel attempts to offer a picture of their psychological and emotional development as they adjust to the great novelist’s passing. It is a potentially effective idea, but Baddiel’s frivolous approach to language and characterization, combined with his evident disregard for the reader, means that that potential is never recognized.

25/03/2011

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