Here on Earth: A New Beginning

Tim Flannery

Here on Earth: A New Beginning

A dual biography of the planet and of our species. Flannery reimagines the history of earth, from its earliest origins as a chaotic ball of elemental gases to the teeming landscape we currently call home. It is a remarkable story. How did life first emerge here? What forces have shaped it? Why did humans come to dominate? And when did we start to have an impact? More importantly, how has this changed us as a species? 3.9 out of 5 based on 4 reviews
Here on Earth: A New Beginning

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre Science & Nature
Format Paperback
Pages 336
RRP £14.99
Date of Publication March 2011
ISBN 978-1846143960
Publisher Allen Lane
 

A dual biography of the planet and of our species. Flannery reimagines the history of earth, from its earliest origins as a chaotic ball of elemental gases to the teeming landscape we currently call home. It is a remarkable story. How did life first emerge here? What forces have shaped it? Why did humans come to dominate? And when did we start to have an impact? More importantly, how has this changed us as a species?

Reviews

The Financial Times

Crispin Tickell

… a triumph of interdisciplinarity … This is a well-written, persuasive and at times alarming venture into past, present and future. It may be easy to read but it is not always comfortable reading. It still deserves to be widely read.

07/03/2011

Read Full Review


The Independent

Colin Tudge

Here on Earth deserves to be widely read, and it will be good for the world if it is. Yet I have a quibble — quite a large one. Flannery is a scientist through and through and like so many professional scientists, he really believes in science. He implies that if only humanity at large saw what the new, Gaia-style biology is saying, then all would be well. But the paradigm shift requires more than that. We need to begin to acknowledge, formally, that science itself is seriously limited in what it can tell us about the world.

11/03/2011

Read Full Review


The Times

Jeanette Winterson

Flannery’s skill is to give us the facts — the state of the planet now — and then to offer us the competing stories that claim to explain the facts. Scientists don’t really like their theories being called stories, but if, like Peter Ward, the palaeontologist, you are going to call your theory of an Earth that destroys life to bring forth life “Medea” — to hit back at the alternative message of the Gaia hypothesis — then you are already in mythic territory. That seems like a good thing to me, because if Flannery is right about the power of narrative and symbol (and every artist would say that he is) then we should look carefully at our own myth-making, and see how, where and why we ask the facts to fit our myths.

12/03/2011

Read Full Review


The Economist

The Economist

The trouble is that the subject is far too big to fit comfortably into a book a little more than 300 pages long. Mr Flannery is a respected biologist with plenty of published papers to his name, but the book feels dilettantish, with a dizzying array of concepts introduced, briefly discussed, then dispensed with before the reader has had time to digest them ... it is still worth reading, though less for answers than for its interesting hypotheses.

03/03/2011

Read Full Review


©2013 The Omnivore