Grace Williams Says it Loud

Emma Henderson

Grace Williams Says it Loud

Disgusting,' said the nurse. And when no more could be done, they put her away, aged eleven. On her first day at the Briar Mental Institute, Grace meets Daniel. He sees a different Grace: someone to share secrets and canoodle with, someone to fight for. Debonair Daniel, who can type with his feet, fills Grace's head with tales from Paris and the world beyond. This is Grace's story: her life, its betrayals and triumphs, disappointment and loss, the taste of freedom; roses, music and tiny scraps of paper. Most of all, it is about the love of a lifetime. 3.5 out of 5 based on 4 reviews
Grace Williams Says it Loud

Omniscore:

Classification Fiction
Genre General Fiction
Format Hardback
Pages 336
RRP £12.99
Date of Publication June 2010
ISBN 978-1444703993
Publisher Sceptre
 

Disgusting,' said the nurse. And when no more could be done, they put her away, aged eleven. On her first day at the Briar Mental Institute, Grace meets Daniel. He sees a different Grace: someone to share secrets and canoodle with, someone to fight for. Debonair Daniel, who can type with his feet, fills Grace's head with tales from Paris and the world beyond. This is Grace's story: her life, its betrayals and triumphs, disappointment and loss, the taste of freedom; roses, music and tiny scraps of paper. Most of all, it is about the love of a lifetime.

Reviews

The Independent on Sunday

David Evans

Superb … Henderson dramatises shocking attitudes to mental illness — doctors refer to the patients as "monstrous" — but her triumph lies in the fact that the reader begins to forget the heroine's condition altogether. Grace's romance with Daniel, a "debonair" epileptic, is tender and convincing; the limber, musical prose peppered with brilliant descriptions...

06/03/2011

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The Sunday Times

Lucy Atkins

Henderson, whose sister was institutionalised in the 1950s, resolutely avoids judgment, focusing instead on the human spirit that blooms despite the circumstances ... There is tenderness, joy, romance (not to mention inventive sex) and heartbreak. The language is tricksy, the subject disturbing. But this book is energetic, passionate and not easily forgotten.

20/06/2010

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The Guardian

Tessa Hadley

The conceit is ingenious, and it works ... If the writing sometimes slackens, it isn't because we don't believe in Grace. The problem may be that everything is told in an implied retrospect, as if she were remembering it much later, mixing together different layers from her past. Sometimes that structure leaches the freshness out of a story, however hard the writer's language works to put the colour back. But this is a sensitive and generous book...

07/08/2010

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The Independent

Freya McClelland

This dynamic first novel is reassuringly upbeat. Henderson succeeds in creating a rich narrative despite the obstacle of limited speech and challenges the reader to confront prejudices about those living with disability.

03/08/2010

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