When God was a Rabbit

Sarah Winman

When God was a Rabbit

Spanning four decades, from 1968 onwards, this is the story of a fabulous but flawed family and the slew of ordinary and extraordinary incidents that shape their everyday lives. It is a story about childhood and growing up, loss of innocence, eccentricity, familial ties and friendships, love and life. 2.9 out of 5 based on 8 reviews
When God was a Rabbit

Omniscore:

Classification Fiction
Genre General
Format Hardcover
Pages 336
RRP £12.99
Date of Publication March 2011
ISBN 978-0755379286
Publisher Headline Review
 

Spanning four decades, from 1968 onwards, this is the story of a fabulous but flawed family and the slew of ordinary and extraordinary incidents that shape their everyday lives. It is a story about childhood and growing up, loss of innocence, eccentricity, familial ties and friendships, love and life.

Reviews

The Times

Kate Saunders

Winman’s narrative voice is beautifully true, with a child’s unsentimental clarity. A superb debut.

12/03/2011

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The Sunday Times

Elizabeth Buchan

The childhood sections are brilliant, the adult ones less magical and occasionally whimsical, but the line between innocence and loss is traced with achingly sad assurance.

08/05/2011

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The Observer

Mary Fitzgerald

...captivating... the characters' personal stories; those of Ellie's brother, his friend Charlie, and her correspondence with her long-lost childhood playmate, Jenny Penny, are compelling throughout; rendered with an appealing frankness, precision and emotional acuity.

20/03/2011

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The Financial Times

Adrian Turpin

...heaves with eccentrics...

04/02/2011

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The Daily Mail

Imogen Lycett Green

Stick with Winman’s deadpan delivery through the pet rabbit called God, the drunkenness, the movie star auntie and the wooded valleys of Cornwall and in the last 50 pages you will be rewarded.

10/03/2011

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The Guardian

Catherine Taylor

Thronging with incident, wonder and outré language, Winman's first book is simultaneously cloying and sharply funny, whimsical and innovative... Though overly contrived, there is enough to charm and entertain here.

26/03/2011

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The Daily Telegraph

Anthony Cummins

Not many writers could make this material distressing, heartwarming and hilarious, which seems to be Winman’s aim. But puzzlingly bad prose is no help and the novel is careless with detail: someone claims to read the News of the World “every morning”.

28/03/2011

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The Spectator

Claudia Fitzherbert

The novel is shaped by the gap of time between the abuse suffered by Elly as a child and her parents’ understanding, when the brave little girl is revealed in all her brave little girl glory. It is the childish sensibility, not the tricks themselves, which make Winman’s debut so unsatisfactory. Elly tells her story with no idea that the self-conscious prattling of a nevertobegainsaid infant is bad enough when relayed by a besotted parent, but unbearable when narrated by the grown-up child without any corresponding growth of existential understanding.

19/03/2011

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