The Elizabethans

AN Wilson

The Elizabethans

Life in Elizabethan England could be very harsh. Plague swept the land. And the poor received little assistance from the State. Thumbscrews and the rack could be the grim prelude to the executioner’s block. But crucially, this was the age when modern Britain was born, and established independence from mainland Europe. After Sir Walter Raleigh established the colony of Virginia, English was destined to become the language of the great globe itself, and the the foundations were laid not only of later British imperial power but also of American domination of the world. A.N. Wilson tells all. 3.4 out of 5 based on 6 reviews
The Elizabethans

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre History
Format Hardback
Pages 448
RRP £25.00
Date of Publication September 2011
ISBN 978-0091931513
Publisher Hutchinson
 

Life in Elizabethan England could be very harsh. Plague swept the land. And the poor received little assistance from the State. Thumbscrews and the rack could be the grim prelude to the executioner’s block. But crucially, this was the age when modern Britain was born, and established independence from mainland Europe. After Sir Walter Raleigh established the colony of Virginia, English was destined to become the language of the great globe itself, and the the foundations were laid not only of later British imperial power but also of American domination of the world. A.N. Wilson tells all.

DANTE IN LOVE by A.N. Wilson

Reviews

The Spectator

Jonathan Bate

It is written with all the verve of the young [A.L.] Rowse, but none of his naïve patriotism ... Academic historians will sneer, but readers will take delight.

10/09/2011

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The Sunday Times

Christopher Hart

There may be too little on economics or technological innovation for some tastes, but it is still a vivid portrait, warts and all … Wilson’s literary enthusiasms are so infectious, you vow to read Spenser’s The Faerie Queene from start to finish, to tackle Sir Philip Sidney’s Arcadia, and even look up the scabrous puritanical pamphlets of Martin Marprelate.

28/08/2011

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The Literary Review

Eric Ives

One can, of course, challenge Wilson's impressionism, but there is no doubt about the overall power of the pictures he draws. Particularly when he is considering the great literary figures — Sidney, Spenser, Marlowe, Shakespeare — there is genuine excitement and empathy. Nor is there any doubt about the author's insight and his capacity to make fruitful and original connections.

01/09/2011

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The Evening Standard

Lucy Worsley

It's easy to digest and it's stirring stuff … But The Elizabethans is also very clearly a book about A.N. Wilson himself: opinionated, idiosyncratic, sniping waspishly at the world of today … All this anti-modernity gets a little tedious.

08/09/2011

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The Sunday Express

Tracy Borman

His witty, conversational style and eye for period detail bring the brilliance and spectacle of the Elizabethan age vividly to life … [The book is] rather disjointed in places and there is little overall sense of progression.

04/09/2011

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The Financial Times

Philippa Gregory

This is a book written in the style of Wilson’s enormously successful The Victorians and will give pleasure to people who like a general overview history of a period. Much of what they read will probably be familiar, some of it feels dated in source and in style. The Elizabethan age is so long, so chaotic, so contradictory, so rich in incident, culture and discovery, that perhaps no general overview could do it justice. But for those who are content to revisit some well-known scenes and also encounter some surprises, there is much to treasure.

02/09/2011

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