My Policeman

Bethan Roberts

My Policeman

From the moment Marion first lays eyes on Tom - her best friend's big brother, broad, blond, blue-eyed - she is smitten.And when he comes home from National Service to be a policeman, Marion, a newly qualified teacher, is determined to win him.Unable to acknowledge the signs that something is amiss, she plunges into marriage, sure that her love is enough for both of them... But Tom has another life, another equally overpowering claim on his affections.Patrick, a curator at the Brighton Museum, is also besotted with his policeman, and opens Tom's eyes to a world previously unknown to him. 3.4 out of 5 based on 4 reviews
My Policeman

Omniscore:

Classification Fiction
Genre General Fiction
Format Hardcover
Pages 352
RRP
Date of Publication February 2012
ISBN 978-0701185848
Publisher Chatto & Windus
 

From the moment Marion first lays eyes on Tom - her best friend's big brother, broad, blond, blue-eyed - she is smitten.And when he comes home from National Service to be a policeman, Marion, a newly qualified teacher, is determined to win him.Unable to acknowledge the signs that something is amiss, she plunges into marriage, sure that her love is enough for both of them... But Tom has another life, another equally overpowering claim on his affections.Patrick, a curator at the Brighton Museum, is also besotted with his policeman, and opens Tom's eyes to a world previously unknown to him.

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Reviews

The Independent

Richard Canning

Roberts deploys her research carefully, honing a novel with a strong period feel and a sprightly structure. It alternates between Patrick's record of his affair with PC Tom Burgess and Tom's wife Marion's memoir, written 40 years later. The debt to sources, however, can be too pronounced. Conversely, some imaginary details prove far-fetched, such as Patrick's description of his lover's "lovely Brighton accent" as "very non-U".

20/03/2012

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The Daily Mail

Harry Ritchie

The carefully depicted setting in what is now gay-friendly Brighton serves to highlight the period-piece nature of their predicament, which is brought convincingly to life and adeptly conveyed by the interweaving narratives of Marion and Patrick

09/02/2012

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The Observer

Natash Tripney

The writing is fluid and tender, the point of view switching between that of a present-day Marion, writing a confessional letter as she cares for a frail and elderly Patrick, and Patrick's diaries of his blossoming relationship with "my policeman". That possessive note is the key to their tragedy and it's telling that the man so desired by them both remains voiceless, distant.

11/03/2012

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The Guardian

Susanna Rusti

While it is interesting to compare Marion's and Patrick's versions of events, and especially their different feelings for Tom, the juxtaposition is a formal oddity, with Patrick's diary entries floating free of the scenario that Roberts has so carefully contrived. But she writes persuasively about both these characters, who find themselves in conflict not only with the rules governing sexual behaviour but with the desires signalled by their own bodies. Her novel is a humane and evocative portrait of a time when lives were destroyed by intolerance.

02/03/2012

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