The God Argument: The Case Against Religion and for Humanism

AC Grayling

The God Argument: The Case Against Religion and for Humanism

There have in recent years been a number of books that have taken issue with religion and argued against it. Both sides in the debate have expressed themselves acerbically because there is a very great deal at stake. The God Argument examines all the arguments and associated considerations offered in support of religious belief. 1.8 out of 5 based on 4 reviews
The God Argument: The Case Against Religion and for Humanism

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre Society, Politics & Philosophy, Religion & Spirituality
Format
Pages
RRP
Date of Publication February 2013
ISBN 978-1620401903
Publisher Bloomsbury
 

There have in recent years been a number of books that have taken issue with religion and argued against it. Both sides in the debate have expressed themselves acerbically because there is a very great deal at stake. The God Argument examines all the arguments and associated considerations offered in support of religious belief.

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Liberty in the Age of Terror by AC Grayling

Towards the Light by AC Grayling

Reviews

The New Statesman

Bryan Appleyard

The broad point is that Grayling, like the other horsemen, goes too far. He narrowly defines religion as a system of physical beliefs and then says such a system has nothing to offer the world. When another atheist, Alain de Botton, gently suggested that non-believers might have something to learn from religion, he was immediately trampled on by the horsemen. But what religion has to offer is a great mountain of insights into the human realm.

28/02/2013

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The Guardian

Jonathan Rée

Grayling sees himself as a champion of the Enlightenment, but in the old battle over the interpretation of religious texts he is on the side of conservative literalist fundamentalists rather than progressive critical liberals. He believes that the scriptures must be taken at their word, rather than being allowed to flourish as many-layered parables, teeming with quarrels, follies, jokes, reversals and paradoxes. Resistance is, of course, futile. If you suggest that his vaunted "clarifications" annihilate the poetry of religious experience or the nuance of theological reflection, he will mark you down for obstructive irrationalism. He is, after all, a professional philosopher, and his training tells him that what cannot be translated into plain words is nothing but sophistry and illusion.

09/03/2013

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The Spectator

Peter Hitchens

This work is full of negative, petti-fogging narrowness, devoid of sympathy for opponents, empty of generosity or modesty, immune to poetry or mystery. Seeking enjoyment in its pages is like trying to quench your thirst with dry biscuits. The rudest thing that I can say about it is that it is pretty much the same as all the other anti-God books. Like Scandinavian crime series on TV, these volumes trundle off the production lines every few months, asserting their authors’ enlightenment and emitting a nasty undertone of spite and intolerance.

02/03/2013

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The Sunday Telegraph

Tom Payne

What’s most lamentable about this book is not the quirks of tone, the infelicities of emphasis or the inconsistency, indeed occasional lack, of method. It’s the façade of appreciating how believers have created great art, without recognising the imaginative process behind it, and indeed behind faith.

27/02/2013

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