Night of Triumph

Peter Bradshaw

Night of Triumph

On VE night, 1945, the then teenage princesses, Elizabeth and Margaret, were allowed to leave the palace incognito and join the parties and festivities with their subjects - pretending to be ordinary people for the first and only time in their lives. Peter Bradshaw takes this nugget of history as the basis for this brilliantly comic crime thriller. Princess Margaret steals a policeman's hat, and Elizabeth encounters London's criminal underworld. The future Queen must use all her wit and courage to get out of a very sticky situation - With sharp but affectionate humour, this is an enjoyable fictional crime caper and is sure to attract comment. 3.3 out of 5 based on 3 reviews
Night of Triumph

Omniscore:

Classification Fiction
Genre General Fiction
Format Hardcover
Pages 128
RRP
Date of Publication January 2013
ISBN 978-0715645017
Publisher Gerald Duckwaorth & Co.
 

On VE night, 1945, the then teenage princesses, Elizabeth and Margaret, were allowed to leave the palace incognito and join the parties and festivities with their subjects - pretending to be ordinary people for the first and only time in their lives. Peter Bradshaw takes this nugget of history as the basis for this brilliantly comic crime thriller. Princess Margaret steals a policeman's hat, and Elizabeth encounters London's criminal underworld. The future Queen must use all her wit and courage to get out of a very sticky situation - With sharp but affectionate humour, this is an enjoyable fictional crime caper and is sure to attract comment.

Reviews

The Financial Times

Trisha Andres

It’s not until she meets Mr Ware, a crook with a Luger, that the princess realises that the night has taken a turn for the worse. Coerced into accompanying him on a raid of a V2-damaged building in Mayfair, Elizabeth is left with only her wits – and a dash of daring – to save her. At times the absurdity of the plot is trying. But Bradshaw’s dark humour and affectionate reimagining of the monarch’s youth make for an entertaining read.

08/03/2013

Read Full Review


The Scotsman

Jane Shilling

Bradshaw admirably conjures up VE Night’s mood of exultation, simmering with ­alcohol, lust and resentment. He has a sharp eye for the grimy textures and chirpy ­argot of wartime life, and a gift for punctuating his narrative with tiny vignettes of shocking pathos. The early chapters, in which the stroppy minx Margaret ­appears, have a spiteful energy that flags a little once she leaves the narrative.

03/02/2013

Read Full Review


The Daily Mail

Harry Ritchie

Inspired by the princesses’ real foray into the VE celebrations, this is both an enjoyable caper and a convincing re-creation of the night’s jolly and not-so-jolly mayhem.

31/01/2013

Read Full Review


©2013 The Omnivore