Let's Explore Diabetes With Owls

David Sedaris

Let's Explore Diabetes With Owls

From the unique perspective of David Sedaris comes a new book of essays taking his readers on a bizarre and stimulating world tour. From the perils of French dentistry to the eating habits of the Australian kookaburra, from the squat-style toilets of Beijing to the particular wilderness of a North Carolina Costco, we learn about the absurdity and delight of a curious traveler's experiences. Whether railing against the habits of litterers in the English countryside or marveling over a disembodied human arm in a taxidermist's shop, Sedaris takes us on side-splitting adventures that are not to be forgotten. 3.5 out of 5 based on 6 reviews
Let's Explore Diabetes With Owls

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre Essays, Journals & Letters, Humour
Format
Pages
RRP
Date of Publication April 2013
ISBN 978-0349121635
Publisher Abacus
 

From the unique perspective of David Sedaris comes a new book of essays taking his readers on a bizarre and stimulating world tour. From the perils of French dentistry to the eating habits of the Australian kookaburra, from the squat-style toilets of Beijing to the particular wilderness of a North Carolina Costco, we learn about the absurdity and delight of a curious traveler's experiences. Whether railing against the habits of litterers in the English countryside or marveling over a disembodied human arm in a taxidermist's shop, Sedaris takes us on side-splitting adventures that are not to be forgotten.

Reviews

The Guardian

David Shariatmadari

This is brave work ... Not because his own life and those of his friends and relatives are mined for material — plenty of writers take pleasure in that. Sedaris is brave because he has no vanity at all, no compunction about revealing himself as weak and obsessive, sometimes cruel and hateful. Luckily for him his writing also sings about how brilliantly clever, inventive and funny he is, a poet for everyone who wouldn't live the ordinary life if you paid them.

27/04/2013

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The Independent

Lisa Gee

Most of this collection is perfectly judged and carefully nuanced. The only off-key parts are the six short monologues Sedaris has written for teenagers to "deliver before a panel of judges", when they're participating in something called "Forensics … a cross between speech and debate". Short, pithy and voiced by shrill caricatures with no self-awareness, they may well be perfect for their natural habitat. But, alongside Sedaris's infinitely more variegated essays, they stand out like, well, shrill caricatures with no self-awareness.

26/04/2013

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The Scotsman

Ashley Davies

David Sedaris clothes his candour with such delicious style, wit and self-deprecation that every little story is a treat that leaves you craving more ... It helps if you know what he sounds like; if you haven’t heard him on Radio 4 (which has already broadcast a few chapters from his latest book) or been to one of his fan-packed readings, imagine the voice of a fiftysomething gay man from North Carolina who values good manners, pronounces the occasional phrase with a sarcastic whisper and knows when to pause and drink in the laughter.

28/04/2013

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The Daily Express

Tom Cox

Even at three quarter power, he is still funnier than 99.9 per cent of published humour writers … If you have read his other work you might feel the end result, not helped by a few jarring digressions into a fictional voice, to be a touch flimsy. If, however, you have never encountered Sedaris before, it might contain some of your biggest laughs of the decade so far, and convince you that more comic fiction would be significantly improved by being about nothing.

28/04/2013

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The Spectator

Wynn Wheldon

He is a staunch anti-Republican. It is not that he doesn’t share many conservative prejudices (he hates litter, obscene T-shirts, Chinese standards of hygiene, graffiti), but that he doesn’t share the extreme ones, and his assumption is that anyone who votes Republican must have them. This is odd, because one of Sedaris’s appeals is his dispassionate observation of himself and his own foibles. His popularity (he has sold in millions) is partly explained perhaps by his willingness to write with honesty about his family ... Sedaris undoes his own can of worms with the sharpest of openers.

27/04/2013

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The Independent on Sunday

Max Liu

Sedaris can make writing look easy but Let's Explore Diabetes with Owls is diminished by clumsy forays into fiction. Several pieces, which discuss topical issues from the perspective of gormless conservatives, make the reader impatient for Sedaris to return to writing about his life. When he does, the results are poignant and amusing, but it's hard to recommend a slim volume of autobiography padded with forgettable stories.

27/04/2013

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