Waiting to Be Heard

Amanda Knox

Waiting to Be Heard

Amanda Knox spent four years in a foreign prison for a crime she did not commit. In the fall of 2007, the 20-year-old college coed left Seattle to study abroad in Italy, but her life was shattered when her roommate was murdered in their apartment. After a controversial trial, Amanda was convicted and imprisoned. But in 2011, an appeals court overturned the decision and vacated the murder charge. Free at last, she returned home to the U.S., where she has remained silent, until now... 3.2 out of 5 based on 4 reviews
Waiting to Be Heard

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre Biography, True Crime
Format
Pages
RRP
Date of Publication April 2013
ISBN 978-0062217202
Publisher Harper
 

Amanda Knox spent four years in a foreign prison for a crime she did not commit. In the fall of 2007, the 20-year-old college coed left Seattle to study abroad in Italy, but her life was shattered when her roommate was murdered in their apartment. After a controversial trial, Amanda was convicted and imprisoned. But in 2011, an appeals court overturned the decision and vacated the murder charge. Free at last, she returned home to the U.S., where she has remained silent, until now...

Reviews

The Observer

Tom Kington

Waiting to Be Heard is better than just required reading for the warring and often obsessive factions that continue to fight over her guilt or innocence in online forums and blogs … The student from Seattle has had time to buff up her prose and the result is an intriguing and often compelling account of the trauma of spending the best years of one's life in an Italian provincial jail, at the whim of what she claims are bumbling, spiteful investigators.

05/05/2013

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The Sunday Times

John Follain

There is at least one omission in her memoir. She mentions the verdict of the Supreme Court only briefly in the About the Author section at the end of the book. It says the Supreme Court has ordered “a new review of the case” — surely “a retrial” is a more appropriate term. She also fails to say that it definitively convicted her of slandering an innocent man ... Does Waiting to Be Heard solve the Kercher case? Of course not. For the pro-innocence camp, the book is undoubtedly the final word at least on Knox’s ordeal. But whatever the reader’s opinion, the book fails to tackle the unanswered questions about Kercher’s death — why, and how, did she die? All questions that still torment the Kercher family.

05/05/2013

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The Guardian

Andrew Gumbel

It is still the story of an innocent abroad, one who saw her year in Italy as a way to "meet maturity head-on" and discover her sexuality. Knox describes how she self-consciously experimented with casual sex and tried to become sophisticated about smoking pot. But she is no longer the conniving she-devil depicted in the tabloids.

04/05/2013

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The New York Times

Michuko Kakutani

By turns evocative and verbose, sympathetic and enigmatic, Ms. Knox says she wants to set “the record straight” in this volume. There are some tidbits of new information in “Waiting to Be Heard,” but large portions of the book’s account of the murder case and trials will be familiar to readers who have followed the voluminous media coverage of the story ... In the end her book is not only an effort to make a case for her innocence but it’s also a kind of bildungsroman.

21/04/2013

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