Wandering Star

Jean-Marie Gustave Le Clézio

Wandering Star

Wandering Star tells the stories of two young girls, one Jewish and one Palestinian, who meet once briefly by chance. Their stories are connected by substance, rather than plot. Each is a wandering star in search of a homeland, Esther escaping the Nazi Holocaust, and Nejma, a Palestinian refugee. Yet through this novel of dark times and human suffering, affirmation shines as the characters encounter the beauty of nature and instances of human kindness and love. Originally published in 2004, Wandering Star is Le Clezio's most recent novel to be translated into English, and perhaps his most traditional in terms of its storytelling narrative. 3.5 out of 5 based on 1 reviews
Wandering Star

Omniscore:

Classification Fiction
Genre General Fiction
Format Paperback
Pages 340
RRP £8.99
Date of Publication October 2004
ISBN 978-1931896115
Publisher Curbstone
 

Wandering Star tells the stories of two young girls, one Jewish and one Palestinian, who meet once briefly by chance. Their stories are connected by substance, rather than plot. Each is a wandering star in search of a homeland, Esther escaping the Nazi Holocaust, and Nejma, a Palestinian refugee. Yet through this novel of dark times and human suffering, affirmation shines as the characters encounter the beauty of nature and instances of human kindness and love. Originally published in 2004, Wandering Star is Le Clezio's most recent novel to be translated into English, and perhaps his most traditional in terms of its storytelling narrative.

Reviews

The Observer

Alison Kelly

Esther's responsiveness to the beauty of the landscape is bound up with her sexual awakening under the competing attentions of two boys. The resulting narrative is highly charged with phenomenological and metaphysical awareness, sometimes to the point of overkill. Having said that, one of the most powerful qualities of the novel is the sense Le Clézio creates of the human connection to place and the anguish of exile and dispossession.

18/01/2009

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