Mountains of the Moon

IJ Kay

Mountains of the Moon

A woman in her thirties is released from prison, with a new name and not much else. She begins to make a fresh start but the present is soon invaded by fragments from her past. 3.5 out of 5 based on 5 reviews
Mountains of the Moon

Omniscore:

Classification Fiction
Genre General Fiction
Format Hardcover
Pages 368
RRP £16.99
Date of Publication February 2012
ISBN 978-0224093767
Publisher Jonathan Cape
 

A woman in her thirties is released from prison, with a new name and not much else. She begins to make a fresh start but the present is soon invaded by fragments from her past.

Reviews

The Guardian

Clare Allan

Mountains of the Moon is not in any sense an easy read. Kay makes great demands on the reader, and apart from a handy cast list at the beginning, offers few concessions to those struggling to weave the various strands into a vaguely comprehensible whole. It is a bold decision, especially for a debut novelist, and one that I fear may deter some readers, but those who persist will be well rewarded. By the end of a second reading – and it took me two readings, I'll admit – there's a sense of having experienced something genuinely unforgettable.

27/01/2012

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The Observer

Orphelia Field

She has a perfect instinct for where to be elliptical and where precise. If the reader becomes disoriented, it is always intentional, mirroring the narrator's own physical and mental disorientation. The more crazy or chaotic the scene, such as the extraction of a horse from a piss-soaked bungalow lounge, or a casino shoot-up with the lights out, the more you appreciate Kay's precision – the single dab that conveys an entire minor character or chain of events.

29/01/2012

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Times Literary Supplement

Sylvia Brownrigg

The prison years go undescribed, but a central element of Louise’s heroic journey is piecing the shards of her various selves together. It is an act demanded of the attentive reader as well. The reward is a submersion in Kay’s fiercely distinctive voice, and descriptions of lyrical intensity.

09/03/2012

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The Literary Review

Jonathan Barnes

This is a harsh, unstinting story, its world that of the dingy institution and the long coach journey, of grisly pubs (‘the landlord with a bucket, swilling blood off his doorstep’), ‘migrainepatterned music’ and appallingly routine abuse (‘the choke chain is done round my ankles and I’m hanging upside down from the banisters’). Such subject matter lends the book a necessarily dour tone. Mostly, one turns the pages out of horrified fascination. Nonetheless, it is also a novel of escape.

01/02/2012

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The Sunday Times

Tom Deveson

There is something unconvincingly operatic about this first novel. It’s tricked out with a cast list, an overture, three acts and a finale; even the 50-year-old author’s name is a quaint pseudonym, as if she were making her debut in disguise ... But the multiple flashbacks and shifts in tone, though full of sensational incident, don’t produce a coherent drama.

12/02/2012

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