The A26

Pascal Garnier

The A26

The future is on its way to Picardy with the construction of a huge motorway. But nearby is a house where nothing has changed since 1945. Traumatised by events that year, Yolande hasn't left her home since. And life has not been kinder to Bernard, her brother, who is now in the final months of a terminal illness. Realizing that he has so little time left, Bernard's gloom suddenly lifts. With no longer anything to lose, he becomes reckless - and murderous. 4.0 out of 5 based on 3 reviews
The A26

Omniscore:

Classification Fiction
Genre General Fiction
Format Paperback
Pages 112
RRP
Date of Publication February 2013
ISBN 978-1908313164
Publisher Gallic Books
 

The future is on its way to Picardy with the construction of a huge motorway. But nearby is a house where nothing has changed since 1945. Traumatised by events that year, Yolande hasn't left her home since. And life has not been kinder to Bernard, her brother, who is now in the final months of a terminal illness. Realizing that he has so little time left, Bernard's gloom suddenly lifts. With no longer anything to lose, he becomes reckless - and murderous.

Reviews

The Independent

Emma Hagestadt

Garnier's novel has been described variously as a roman gris and a roman dur. While this is an undeniably steely work, his translator Melanie Florence does justice to the author's occasional outbreaks of dark humour that suddenly pierce though the clouds of encroaching existential gloom.

08/02/2013

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The Daily Telegraph

Mark Sanderson

A brilliant exercise in grim and gripping irony, it makes you grin as well as wince.

11/02/2013

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The Sunday Times

David Mills

Pascal Garnier, who died in 2010 aged 60, has often been compared to Georges Simenon, writing short, thriller-type ­novels with downbeat settings, heavy on atmosphere and with a laconic turn of phrase and journalistic eye for the telling detail … The events in Simenon’s ­Maigret stories are seemingly random and opaque until the great detective perceives how they all fit together; in The A26 we get the story from the other side, as it were, and without any ­intervention by the forces of good.

10/02/2013

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