Signs of Life

Anna Raverat

Signs of Life

Ten years ago, Rachel had an affair. It left her life in pieces. Now, writing at her window, she tries to put those pieces together again. She has her memories, recollections of dreams, and her old yellow notebook. More than anything, she wants to be honest. Rachel knows that her memory is patchy and her notebook incomplete. But there is something else. Something terrible happened to her lover. Her account is hypnotic, delicate, disquieting and bold. But is she telling us the truth? 4.0 out of 5 based on 4 reviews
Signs of Life

Omniscore:

Classification Fiction
Genre General Fiction
Format Paperback
Pages 320
RRP
Date of Publication January 2013
ISBN 978-0330544481
Publisher Picador
 

Ten years ago, Rachel had an affair. It left her life in pieces. Now, writing at her window, she tries to put those pieces together again. She has her memories, recollections of dreams, and her old yellow notebook. More than anything, she wants to be honest. Rachel knows that her memory is patchy and her notebook incomplete. But there is something else. Something terrible happened to her lover. Her account is hypnotic, delicate, disquieting and bold. But is she telling us the truth?

Reviews

The Guardian

Catherine Taylor

In Rachel, surveying the mess at a distance of 10 years, we have a narrator subject to fits and starts of memory and unreliability. This untrustworthiness, and Raverat's classy, accomplished prose, make for a work of intense claustrophobia.

27/02/2013

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The Independent

Emma Hagestadt

… highly readeable debut …

08/02/2013

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The Independent on Sunday

David Evans

The book works as both a suspenseful psychological thriller and a sophisticated meditation on the act of writing; at its centre is the idea that the impulse to write stems from a desire to gain purchase on life's slippery surfaces.

24/02/2013

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The Daily Mail

Katherine Whitbourne

Cleverly told in narrative segments that meander from past to present and back again, the book raises intriguing questions about the modern preoccupation with moving on, and whether such a thing is really possible.

12/04/2012

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