My Brother's Book

Maurice Sendak

My Brother's Book

My Brother’s Book is Maurice Sendak’s last complete work and one that he considered the most important. A moving homage to his brother, Jack, in which Sendak’s poignant verse is paired with exquisite artwork. 4.3 out of 5 based on 5 reviews
My Brother's Book

Omniscore:

Classification Fiction
Genre General Fiction
Format Hardcover
Pages 32
RRP
Date of Publication January 2013
ISBN 978-0007509164
Publisher HarperCollins
 

My Brother’s Book is Maurice Sendak’s last complete work and one that he considered the most important. A moving homage to his brother, Jack, in which Sendak’s poignant verse is paired with exquisite artwork.

Reviews

The Observer

Helen Zaltzman

The greater danger comes from within, the anger and grief that fuelled Sendak throughout his life. This is a beautiful tribute to "his noble-hearted brother/ Who he loves more than his own self", but both devastating and devastated.

02/03/2013

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The Times

Erica Wagner

Guy’s quest for reunion with his lost sibling has echoes of the desperate magic of Shakespeare’s late plays, such as The Winter’s Tale. The illustrations are gorgeous and hallucinative: naked Guy is drawn up into a sky filmed with stars, into the maw of a cosmic polar bear. It is a work that mourns loss, and yet accepts and transcends it.

23/02/2013

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The Daily Telegraph

Martin Chilton

The book sparkles with tributes to people who influenced Sendak. In 12 illustrated spreads, you feel the effect Shakespeare's The Winter's Tale — a play Sendak wept throughout when taken to see for the first time — had on his imagination. The lyricism of Emily Dickinson is discernible, and many of the dreamlike illustrations, all with subtle grey borders, owe much to William Blake’s Songs of Innocence and of Experience.

05/03/2013

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The Independent

Nichoas Tucker

With both text and illustrations packed with images that defy easy understanding, this book offers a journey into an extraordinary imagination. Not really designed to be read through at one sitting, it is directed more towards a child's intuitive acceptance of how the everyday can walk hand in hand with the surreal. Each re-reading reveals something new as the old master bids adieu, not just to the brother who meant so much to him but to all his readers as well.

09/03/2013

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The New York Times

Dwight Garner

I disliked it my first time through; I found it a bit evasive, more artiness than art. I wasn’t sure that I cared about Jack or Guy, whose appeal we are supposed to take for granted. Yet it’s a book that rewards repeat readings. Its charms are simmering and reflective ones. This moral fable may find its largest audience among adults.

14/02/2013

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