Gone Again

Doug Johnstone

Gone Again

'It's just to say that no-one has come to pick Nathan up from school, and we were wondering if there was a problem of some kind?' As Mark Douglas photographs a pod of whales stranded in the waters off Edinburgh's Portobello Beach, he is called by his son's school: his wife, Lauren, hasn't turned up to collect their son. Calm at first, Mark collects Nathan and takes him home but as the hours slowly crawl by he increasingly starts to worry. 3.7 out of 5 based on 3 reviews
Gone Again

Omniscore:

Classification Fiction
Genre General Fiction
Format Paperback
Pages 256
RRP
Date of Publication March 2013
ISBN 978-0571296606
Publisher Faber and Faber
 

'It's just to say that no-one has come to pick Nathan up from school, and we were wondering if there was a problem of some kind?' As Mark Douglas photographs a pod of whales stranded in the waters off Edinburgh's Portobello Beach, he is called by his son's school: his wife, Lauren, hasn't turned up to collect their son. Calm at first, Mark collects Nathan and takes him home but as the hours slowly crawl by he increasingly starts to worry.

Smokeheads by Doug Johnstone.

Reviews

The Independent

Rebecca Armstrong

As thrillers go, Gone Again's plot isn't fiendishly deceptive, or out to confound you at every point. Neither is it an against-the-clock adventure with the future of the world at stake. Its appeal lies in a certain quietness; that it is more about one family's trauma than a larger, more explosive chain of events. It's a very honest book about love and loss – the loss of youth, the loss of innocence, and the loss of trust.

16/03/2013

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Scotland on Sunday

Alice Wyllie

The book does build to a rather hammy conclusion with rather more gunshot wounds than you’d expect in Portobello, but there’s a heartbreaking sweetness to the relationship at its core; the one between Mark and Nathan.

10/03/2013

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The Times

Marcel Berlins

Doug Johnstone is particularly sharp and moving in describing the reactions of a six-year-old boy to his mother’s enduring absence.

09/03/2013

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