I Am Forbidden

Anouk Markovits

I Am Forbidden

Sisters Atara and Mila were born at the onset of the Second World War into a deeply insular, ultra-orthodox Jewish sect. As the girls grow up, Mila finds she is content to live within the constraints and familiarity of the world she's always known, but Atara is consumed by questions - about arranged marriage, the education of girls, the circumstances surrounding the escape of the sect's leader during the war. Finally forced apart by the rules of the community, the two women are brought together again when a family secret threatens to make pariahs of them all. 4.0 out of 5 based on 3 reviews
I Am Forbidden

Omniscore:

Classification Fiction
Genre General Fiction
Format Paperback
Pages 288
RRP
Date of Publication February 2013
ISBN 978-0099571940
Publisher Vintage
 

Sisters Atara and Mila were born at the onset of the Second World War into a deeply insular, ultra-orthodox Jewish sect. As the girls grow up, Mila finds she is content to live within the constraints and familiarity of the world she's always known, but Atara is consumed by questions - about arranged marriage, the education of girls, the circumstances surrounding the escape of the sect's leader during the war. Finally forced apart by the rules of the community, the two women are brought together again when a family secret threatens to make pariahs of them all.

Reviews

The Financial Times

Maria Crawford

Using the language of the scriptures, Markovits depicts religion’s potential for both beauty and cruelty, and the inevitability of transgression even in the most devout life.

29/03/2013

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The New York Times

Susannah Meadows

The wonder of this elegant, enthralling novel is the beauty Ms. Markovits unearths in the Hasidic community she takes us into. She remains largely nonjudgmental about the most difficult-to-grasp practices of the Satmar sect, while showing how even the most fervent believers struggle with the letter-of-the-law faith.

15/03/2012

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The Daily Telegraph

Catherine Taylor

Markovits has first-hand knowledge of the intense and intensely ritualised life of Hasidim. Through Mila’s and Atara’s different reactions to their upbringing she is even-handed about the lowly role of women within orthodox religious groups and of the sometimes wilful other-worldliness and blind following of rabbinic teachings that can become politically expedient. She also shows the astonishing beauty of tradition and sacrifice ...

21/04/2013

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