Heft

Liz Moore

Heft

Former academic Arthur Opp weighs 550 pounds and hasn't left his rambling Brooklyn home in a decade. Twenty miles away, in Yonkers, seventeen-year-old Kel Keller navigates life as the poor kid in a rich school and pins his hopes on what seems like a promising sporting career - if he can untangle himself from his family drama. The link between this unlikely pair is Kel's mother, Charlene, a former student of Arthur's. After nearly two decades of silence, it is Charlene's unexpected phone call to Arthur - a plea for help - that jostles them into action. 3.7 out of 5 based on 5 reviews
Heft

Omniscore:

Classification Fiction
Genre General Fiction
Format Paperback
Pages 352
RRP
Date of Publication March 2013
ISBN 978-0099558729
Publisher Windmill Books
 

Former academic Arthur Opp weighs 550 pounds and hasn't left his rambling Brooklyn home in a decade. Twenty miles away, in Yonkers, seventeen-year-old Kel Keller navigates life as the poor kid in a rich school and pins his hopes on what seems like a promising sporting career - if he can untangle himself from his family drama. The link between this unlikely pair is Kel's mother, Charlene, a former student of Arthur's. After nearly two decades of silence, it is Charlene's unexpected phone call to Arthur - a plea for help - that jostles them into action.

Reviews

The Guardian

Jane Housham

Moore's skill is to unfold their stories, freighted with unhappiness, in a way that is touching, not to say intensely moving, while never becoming mawkish.

19/04/2013

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The Times

Melissa Katsoulis

As we follow Kel, Yolanda and Arthur towards their eventual, unlikely alignment, Liz Moore’s skill as a tight storyteller is matched by her sensitivity to the things people do to stay safe: the layers of ballast we collect around ourselves to make our collisions with the world more bearable, whether they consist of food, youthful posturing, obsession with sport or romantic love … Full of surprises and love and healing, Heft is the most unsentimental sentimental journey you will read this year.

21/04/2013

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The Sunday Times

Francesca Angelini

In Kel and Arthur, Moore finds two tender and honest — although not entirely distinct — voices, and she switches between them with the timing of a film-maker, comfortably drawing their narratives together. What jars, though, are the ­clichés that Moore insists on slipping in: the last time Arthur went ­outside was 9/11; most of Kel’s childhood friends are pregnant or have died from overdoses; the permanently drunk Charlene wears a stained T-shirt emblazoned with “It’s Five O’Clock Somewhere.” But the clarity of the prose — which consciously avoids stylistic showiness or literary pretensions — is adequate compensation ...

29/04/2013

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The Independent

David Evans

Moore alternates between Arthur and Kel as their stories gradually converge. Though I found Kel's tale – the poor kid in a rich school, redeemed by his sporting prowess – a little clichéd, Arthur is a fine creation, his coy, tentative narration slowly yielding clues to his relationship with his father, a famous architect whose favoured minimalist style reflects an emotional coldness. The result is moving but never maudlin, and the conclusion is refreshingly open-ended.

27/04/2013

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The Daily Mail

Wendy Holden

While the plot had me riveted for the first half, I felt the air go out of things after that. Liz Moore is, however, a wonderful writer and especially perceptive and witty on wealthy American teens. She could write a brilliant book about them, and I hope she does.

10/05/2013

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©2013 The Omnivore