A Monster Calls

Patrick Ness

A Monster Calls

The monster showed up just after midnight. As they do. But it isn’t the monster Conor's been expecting. He's been expecting the one from his nightmare, the one he's had nearly every night since his mother started her treatments, the one with the darkness and the wind and the screaming... The monster in his back garden, though, this monster is something different. Something ancient, something wild. And it wants the most dangerous thing of all from Conor. It wants the truth. Costa Award winner Patrick Ness spins a tale from the final idea of much-loved Carnegie Medal winner Siobhan Dowd, whose premature death from cancer prevented her from writing it herself. 4.6 out of 5 based on 6 reviews
A Monster Calls

Omniscore:

Classification Fiction
Genre Children's & Teenage
Format Hardcover
Pages 224
RRP £12.99
Date of Publication May 2011
ISBN 978-1406311525
Publisher Walker
 

The monster showed up just after midnight. As they do. But it isn’t the monster Conor's been expecting. He's been expecting the one from his nightmare, the one he's had nearly every night since his mother started her treatments, the one with the darkness and the wind and the screaming... The monster in his back garden, though, this monster is something different. Something ancient, something wild. And it wants the most dangerous thing of all from Conor. It wants the truth. Costa Award winner Patrick Ness spins a tale from the final idea of much-loved Carnegie Medal winner Siobhan Dowd, whose premature death from cancer prevented her from writing it herself.

Read an extract from the book | The Guardian

Reviews

The Independent

Daniel Hahn

Ness, like Dowd, is a brilliant and acclaimed creator of books for older children and young adults, but the two novelists' voices, their concerns, their styles, are quite different. Many people – myself included – thought this a peculiar piece of casting. Well, shows how much I know ... Brave and beautiful, full of compassion, A Monster Calls fuses the painful and insightful, the simple and profound. The result trembles with life.

10/05/2011

Read Full Review


The Daily Mail

Sally Morris

Stunningly illustrated, this haunting and demanding book shines with compassion, insight and flashes of humour and is a collaboration that highlights the exceptional talents of  Ness, Dowd and Kay. A worthy tribute.

05/05/2011

Read Full Review


The Daily Telegraph

Martin Chilton

Although it's a dark and mournful book (it's been shortlisted for Children's Book Of The Year by both Red House and Galaxy) it's also resplendent, not least for the superb illustrations by Jim Kay. The drawings are part of the very fabric of the book, almost seeming to grow out of the page, like the tree monster himself.

13/12/2011

Read Full Review


The Guardian

Frank Cottrell Boyce

The book has the thrills and ambition you would expect from the author of the Chaos Walking trilogy. It's also easy to trace Dowd's influence ... It's also an extraordinarily beautiful book. Kay's menacing, energetic illustrations and the way they interact with the text, together with the lavish production values, make it a joy just to hold in your hand.

07/05/2011

Read Full Review


The Times

Amanda Craig

Beautifully published with superb illustrations by Jim Kay, it has undertones of Ted Hughes’s The Iron Man. There is, however, a problem: who is this book for? It won’t console a child whose mother is dying, nor will it inform those who want to find out, say, how to understand or offer support. It’s an outstanding parable about the indescribable horror and tragedy of death — gripping, moving and brilliantly crafted — but to me it reads as an adult book, not a children’s one.

14/05/2011

Read Full Review


The Sunday Telegraph

Judith Woods

Death casts a long and allegorical shadow over this evocatively illustrated, at times lyrical, tale. Electrifying and hugely readable, it feels like a genuine act of authorial kindness when the gut-wrenching ending conveys a glimmer of redemption.

08/07/2011

Read Full Review


©2013 The Omnivore