Life: An Exploded Diagram

Mal Peet

Life: An Exploded Diagram

Clem Ackroyd lives with his parents and grandmother in a claustrophobic home too small to accommodate their larger-than-life characters in the bleak Norlfolk countryside. Clem's life changes irrevocably when he meets Frankie, the daughter of a wealthy farmer, and experiences first love, in all its pain and glory. The story is told in flashback by Clem when he is living and working in New York City as a designer, and moves from the past of his parents and grandmother to his own teenage years. 4.0 out of 5 based on 4 reviews
Life: An Exploded Diagram

Omniscore:

Classification Fiction
Genre General Fiction, Children's & Teenage
Format Paperback
Pages 416
RRP £7.99
Date of Publication June 2011
ISBN 978-1844281008
Publisher Walker
 

Clem Ackroyd lives with his parents and grandmother in a claustrophobic home too small to accommodate their larger-than-life characters in the bleak Norlfolk countryside. Clem's life changes irrevocably when he meets Frankie, the daughter of a wealthy farmer, and experiences first love, in all its pain and glory. The story is told in flashback by Clem when he is living and working in New York City as a designer, and moves from the past of his parents and grandmother to his own teenage years.

Reviews

The Daily Telegraph

Philip Womack

Peet’s novel ought to win prizes: it will suit any teen with even the slightest interest in history and human nature.

08/07/2011

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The Independent on Sunday

Nicholas Tucker

Early on Clem assures his readers that he is not writing yet another teenage misery memoir, and has no desire to "add my small pebble to that avalanche of unhappiness". He is as good as his word. Despite its main subject matter, this is still a richly comic novel. There is a real sense of loss coming to its end even after 413 pages have whipped by.

19/06/2011

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The Guardian

Meg Rosoff

... a subtle, minutely observed novel with a huge heart and a bold historical sweep ... a rare treat for thoughtful readers of any age. Read it yourself. Then, if you can think of a young person with the wit to appreciate it, pass it along.

11/06/2011

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The Independent

Daniel Hahn

Peet moves us effortlessly through time. His book jumps in chronology and shifts in scale: one paragraph begins with the ship Granma bound for Cuba carrying Fidel and Che, and ends with Brian Woods throwing Clem's cap on to the back of a passing lorry. And it does so with pin-sharp humour.

10/06/2011

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