Aya of Yop City

Marguerite Abouet, Clément Oubrerie, Helge Dascher (trs.)

Aya of Yop City

For the residents of Yopougon, everyday life is good. It is the early 1970s, a golden time - work is plentiful, hospitals are clean and well equipped, and school is obligatory. The Ivory Coast is as an island of relative wealth and stability in West Africa. For the teenagers of the town, though, worries are plentiful, and life in Yop City is far from simple."Aya" tells the story of its nineteen-year-old heroine, the clear-sighted and bookish Aya, and her carefree and fun-loving friends Adjoua and Bintou. Navigating meddling relatives and neighbours, the girls spend a last summer of their childhood on the sun-warmed streets of Yop City - sneaking out for dancing at open-air bars, strong solibra beer, chicken in peanut sauce and avoiding at all costs the scandal pages of the "Calamity Morning"... 4.0 out of 5 based on 1 reviews
Aya of Yop City

Omniscore:

Classification Fiction
Genre Comics & Graphic Novels, Children's & Teenage
Format Hardback
Pages 128
RRP £15.99
Date of Publication January 2009
ISBN 978-0224087476
Publisher Jonathan Cape
 

For the residents of Yopougon, everyday life is good. It is the early 1970s, a golden time - work is plentiful, hospitals are clean and well equipped, and school is obligatory. The Ivory Coast is as an island of relative wealth and stability in West Africa. For the teenagers of the town, though, worries are plentiful, and life in Yop City is far from simple."Aya" tells the story of its nineteen-year-old heroine, the clear-sighted and bookish Aya, and her carefree and fun-loving friends Adjoua and Bintou. Navigating meddling relatives and neighbours, the girls spend a last summer of their childhood on the sun-warmed streets of Yop City - sneaking out for dancing at open-air bars, strong solibra beer, chicken in peanut sauce and avoiding at all costs the scandal pages of the "Calamity Morning"...

Reviews

The Daily Telegraph

Sameer Rahim

The stories have an enjoyable air of nostalgia about them, enhanced by the dark browns and dusky pinks of the panels. Each character’s movements are nicely drawn: the man brushing his teeth and throwing on his clothes as he moves from one assignation to the next; Aya and Bintou walking nervously through a poorer district of town. But what really makes these books worth reading is their warmth and generosity.

09/02/2009

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