Jamilti and Other Stories

Rutu Modan

Jamilti and Other Stories

Rutu Modan's "Exit Wounds" was chosen by "The Times" as one of the three best graphic novels of 2007. It won the 2008 Eisner Award for the Best New Graphic Novel and was nominated for the Angouleme Best Comic Book Prize. "Jamilti and Other Stories" collects Modan's early short works: stories that range from darkly fantastical and unsettling to surprising discoveries that shape personal identity. And, as in "Exit Wounds", she addresses political violence affecting everyday lives. 4.3 out of 5 based on 3 reviews
Jamilti and Other Stories

Omniscore:

Classification Fiction
Genre Comics & Graphic Novels
Format Hardback
Pages 176
RRP £14.99
Date of Publication April 2009
ISBN 978-0224087704
Publisher Jonathan Cape
 

Rutu Modan's "Exit Wounds" was chosen by "The Times" as one of the three best graphic novels of 2007. It won the 2008 Eisner Award for the Best New Graphic Novel and was nominated for the Angouleme Best Comic Book Prize. "Jamilti and Other Stories" collects Modan's early short works: stories that range from darkly fantastical and unsettling to surprising discoveries that shape personal identity. And, as in "Exit Wounds", she addresses political violence affecting everyday lives.

Reviews

The Guardian

Michel Faber

The author's afterword, and interviews she's given elsewhere, make it clear that she regards these stories as steps towards artistic maturity, a gradual progression that ended in Exit Wounds. If that book was no masterpiece, does this mean that Jamilti and Other Stories is a ragbag of juvenilia? Not at all. In my view, Jamilti is the more interesting book, and it raises important questions about current notions - held by both consumers and creators - of how comics for grownups ideally ought to function.

25/04/2009

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The Times

Neel Mukherjee

...this is even better than Exit Wounds... Modan tells her stories with impeccable economy, each picture really worth a thousand words. Almost every story here has the depth of an Alice Munro short story and that crucial interpretive indeterminacy, something withheld, something that resists pinning down. Above all, it’s the deep humanity of her works that is so startling; she holds it forward in all its ragged, fallible, flawed wholeness and we feel almost an enlightenment after reading them.

06/05/2009

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The Observer

Roger Sabin

...very poignant... Drawn in a style that's indebted to the European indie scene, in pitch-perfect flat colour, they trace the lives of ordinary Israelis in often extraordinary situations.

10/05/2009

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