I Like My Job

Sarah Herman

I Like My Job

"I liked my job...The office was nice...I worked with nice people..." 'I Like My Job' begins with its protagonist facing the numbing realisation that her job is no longer challenging. From performance review to unwanted promotion we follow her ups and downs against a backdrop of petty office politics. But hers isn't a mundane every-day-is-the-same existence. Instead there are a series of quite unexpected characters and events. There is the omnipresent know-it-all cat fairy, willing to sympathise with her and stitch her up to her boss. Then there is the mysterious pineapple preening itself between the monitors, who hides a tale of email woe. People leave, people join, the company moves location, she is not-quite promoted. At each event she is torn between her fear of change and her understanding that there is nothing but change. At the same time the company she works for is also struggling to respond appropriately. Ultimately a strange and sobering sequence of events propels her to consider the impossible. 3.5 out of 5 based on 1 reviews
I Like My Job

Omniscore:

Classification Fiction
Genre Comics & Graphic Novels
Format Paperback
Pages 296
RRP £12.99
Date of Publication June 2009
ISBN 978-0224085762
Publisher Jonathan Cape
 

"I liked my job...The office was nice...I worked with nice people..." 'I Like My Job' begins with its protagonist facing the numbing realisation that her job is no longer challenging. From performance review to unwanted promotion we follow her ups and downs against a backdrop of petty office politics. But hers isn't a mundane every-day-is-the-same existence. Instead there are a series of quite unexpected characters and events. There is the omnipresent know-it-all cat fairy, willing to sympathise with her and stitch her up to her boss. Then there is the mysterious pineapple preening itself between the monitors, who hides a tale of email woe. People leave, people join, the company moves location, she is not-quite promoted. At each event she is torn between her fear of change and her understanding that there is nothing but change. At the same time the company she works for is also struggling to respond appropriately. Ultimately a strange and sobering sequence of events propels her to consider the impossible.

Reviews

The Guardian

Craig Taylor

Herman's drawing style falls somewhere between James Thurber's whimsy and the menacing weirdness of David Shrigley... When Herman tells the story of a co-worker's suicide, the light minimalism doesn't quite carry the weight of the situation. But there are enough sharp observations here to make this an excellent leaving gift for any departing white-collar worker.

27/06/2009

Read Full Review


©2013 The Omnivore