The House that Groaned

Karrie Fransman

The House that Groaned

141 Rottin Road

'A cosy, one-bedroom apartment on the first floor of a charming Victorian conversion. Newly decorated and with a separate kitchen and reception room. Located just a bus ride away from a wide range of shops, restaurants and bars.'

Welcome to The House that Groaned and the six lonely inhabitants of its separate flats, characters so at odds with themselves and their bodies that they could only have stepped out of the pages of a comic novel. There's Barbara, our make-up artist heroine and man-made blonde bombshell; Matt, the photographic retoucher who can't touch; Janet, the tormented dietician; twenty-something Brian, the diseaseophile whose sexual penchant takes him to the edge of perversion; old Mrs Durbach, who literally blends in to the background; and the gloriously fleshy and hedonistic Marion, matriarch of the Midnight Feasters.
3.8 out of 5 based on 2 reviews
The House that Groaned

Omniscore:

Classification Fiction
Genre Comics & Graphic Novels
Format Hardcover
Pages 208
RRP £14.99
Date of Publication January 2012
ISBN 978-0224086813
Publisher Square Peg
 

141 Rottin Road

'A cosy, one-bedroom apartment on the first floor of a charming Victorian conversion. Newly decorated and with a separate kitchen and reception room. Located just a bus ride away from a wide range of shops, restaurants and bars.'

Welcome to The House that Groaned and the six lonely inhabitants of its separate flats, characters so at odds with themselves and their bodies that they could only have stepped out of the pages of a comic novel. There's Barbara, our make-up artist heroine and man-made blonde bombshell; Matt, the photographic retoucher who can't touch; Janet, the tormented dietician; twenty-something Brian, the diseaseophile whose sexual penchant takes him to the edge of perversion; old Mrs Durbach, who literally blends in to the background; and the gloriously fleshy and hedonistic Marion, matriarch of the Midnight Feasters.

Reviews

The Guardian

Rachel Cooke

Fransman uses flashback to devastating effect. Mostly, the destinies of her apple-cheeked characters – her faces are all circles – turn on a single, humiliating moment. But this isn't to say that The House That Groaned is unremittingly dark. It's often funny.

24/02/2012

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The Guardian

James Smart

It's an enjoyable tale, dark but full of energy, fascinated by the private lives and perversity that bulge beneath suburbia's facade.

21/02/2012

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