The Girl on the Stairs

Louise Welsh

The Girl on the Stairs

Jane Logan is a stranger to Berlin and she finds the city alive and echoing with the ghosts of its turbulent past. At six months pregnant, she's instructed by her partner Petra to rest and enjoy her new life in Germany. But while Petra is out at work, Jane begins to feel uneasy in their chic apartment. Screams reverberate through the walls, lights flicker in the derelict building that looms over the yard, a shadow passes on the stairs 3.6 out of 5 based on 4 reviews
The Girl on the Stairs

Omniscore:

Classification Fiction
Genre General Fiction, Crime, Thrillers & Mystery
Format Hardcover
Pages 288
RRP
Date of Publication August 2012
ISBN 978-1848546486
Publisher John Murray
 

Jane Logan is a stranger to Berlin and she finds the city alive and echoing with the ghosts of its turbulent past. At six months pregnant, she's instructed by her partner Petra to rest and enjoy her new life in Germany. But while Petra is out at work, Jane begins to feel uneasy in their chic apartment. Screams reverberate through the walls, lights flicker in the derelict building that looms over the yard, a shadow passes on the stairs

Reviews

The Guardian

Cathi Unsworth

The Girl on the Stairs feels like a ghost story. Taking place in a haunted city, the book's knowing evocation of "Don't Look Now", Du Maurier's Venice-set story, is sharpened by the fact that this mother is not grieving the loss of a child but anticipating a birth. Yet what Welsh knows, and brings to a bloody conclusion, is that no supernatural manifestation of our darkest hours is any match for what real human beings can do to each other.

31/08/2012

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The Independent

Jane Jakeman

Welsh keeps the reader turning to pursue the multiple stories threading through the pages. As for the solutions, they dovetail in the final chapters, but the love of prestidigitation evident in The Bullet Trick' opens multiple possibilities at the end.

18/08/2012

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The Observer

Natatsha Tripney

Welsh expertly conveys the escalation of Jane's suspicions to something approaching obsession. The novel's power is slightly undermined by a cluttered conclusion that piles revelation upon revelation, but its grip until this point is considerable.

05/08/2012

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The Times

John Dugdale

An epigraph from The Turn of the Screw makes clear that Henry James is Welsh’s main influence here, and she builds up atmosphere admirably, giving her protagonist the same dilemmas as James’s governess (is she fantasising child abuse, or are her fears justified? Should she intervene?). But where James’s ending retains ambiguity, Welsh’s resolves all the book’s puzzles, which is normally satisfying but in this case leaves you regretting the loss of complexity.

05/08/2012

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