Standing in Another Man's Grave

Ian Rankin

Standing in Another Man's Grave

It's twenty-five years since John Rebus appeared on the scene, and five years since he retired. But 2012 sees his return in STANDING IN ANOTHER MAN'S GRAVE. Not only is Rebus as stubborn and anarchic as ever, but he finds himself in trouble with Rankin's latest creation, Malcolm Fox of Edinburgh's internal affairs unit. Added to which, Rebus may be about to derail the career of his ex-colleague Siobhan Clarke, while himself being permanently derailed by mob boss and old adversary Big Ger Cafferty. 3.9 out of 5 based on 8 reviews
Standing in Another Man's Grave

Omniscore:

Classification Fiction
Genre General Fiction, Crime, Thrillers & Mystery
Format Hardcover
Pages 352
RRP
Date of Publication November 2012
ISBN 978-1409144717
Publisher Orion
 

It's twenty-five years since John Rebus appeared on the scene, and five years since he retired. But 2012 sees his return in STANDING IN ANOTHER MAN'S GRAVE. Not only is Rebus as stubborn and anarchic as ever, but he finds himself in trouble with Rankin's latest creation, Malcolm Fox of Edinburgh's internal affairs unit. Added to which, Rebus may be about to derail the career of his ex-colleague Siobhan Clarke, while himself being permanently derailed by mob boss and old adversary Big Ger Cafferty.

Doors Open by Ian Rankin

Reviews

The Daily Mail

Geoffrey Wansell

The prose is as ferocious as ever, the sense of place matchless: this is British crime writing of the finest, lasting quality.

22/11/2012

Read Full Review


The Daily Express

Michelle Davies

Fox and his team are too one-dimensional here, squeezed off the page by a far more richly drawn Rebus. Fox deserves better. Almost as inconsequential is the plot … Disappointing denouement aside, we are at least left with the prospect of another Rebus novel to follow. There is life in the old dog yet.

18/11/2012

Read Full Review


The Financial Times

Christopher Fowler

If this murder plot is less complex than usual (this is Rebus’s 18th outing), it allows more room for the curmudgeon to expound his views, bark orders and take note of the towns with distilleries.

23/11/2012

Read Full Review


The Guardian

Mark Lawson

While some elements of Rebus are generic (troubles with drink and women), he is without doubt the funniest among the classic fictional detectives, and his 19th case features some fine one-liners and a satisfying gag involving a bossy colleague's stapler. Standing in Another Man's Grave is a less convoluted puzzle than many of the Rebus novels (the solution becomes decipherable relatively early), but it is Rankin's most interesting book politically, marking a vital stage in the consideration of Scottish nationalist sentiment that has been a constant background to the series.

01/11/2012

Read Full Review


The Daily Telegraph

Jake Kerridge

There are plenty of passages in this book to remind us why Rebus and Rankin have become a cherished part of the city’s incomparable literary heritage. I’m not sure the same will ever be said of Malcolm Fox, the cop Rankin has spent most of his time writing about since Rebus’s retirement, who makes fleeting appearances here. I’ve enjoyed Rankin’s three-dimensional portrayal of this ordinary, decent bloke, but in this book he slips with surprising ease into the role of the prig ...

05/11/2012

Read Full Review


The Literary Review

Jessica Mann

... as reliable as it is successful, so this instalment will thrill his many fans

01/11/2012

Read Full Review


The Observer

Alison Flood

"Most cops looked like cops, but Fox could have been middle management in a plastics company or Inland Revenue," thinks Rebus. This very contrast might prove problematic for the author in future books; Fox was a compelling hero in previous novels but he's pallid in comparison with Rebus.

18/11/2012

Read Full Review


The Sunday Times

John Dugdale

The point of the novel’s ­endless toing and froing may be that Scotland doesn’t add up, that it is a set of recalcitrant, disparate clues without a solution. But if that is the aim, it often makes for tedious reading … Rebus’s comeback novel is hence a bewildering mixture of good and bad, interlacing an impeccably crafted whodunnit with a very un-Kerouacian road novel that almost seems designed to be dull.

04/11/2012

Read Full Review


©2013 The Omnivore