Theodora

Stella Duffy

Theodora

A fictional account of real-life controversial seductress, Theodora of Constantinople, who rose from nothing to become the most powerful woman in the Holy Roman Empire. 4.2 out of 5 based on 4 reviews
Theodora

Omniscore:

Classification Fiction
Genre Historical Fiction
Format Hardback
Pages 352
RRP £15.99
Date of Publication June 2010
ISBN 978-1844082155
Publisher Virago
 

A fictional account of real-life controversial seductress, Theodora of Constantinople, who rose from nothing to become the most powerful woman in the Holy Roman Empire.

Read an interview with Stella Duffy about her book (The Scotsman)

Reviews

The Financial Times

Kate Williams

...a bravura performance: a witty, moving, sexy book... This is a book that engages with big ideas about religion, spirituality and the role of women and yet it is also a joyous and energetic read. The pace is brisk, the dialogue is earthy and contemporary and Duffy is wonderful on the theatre and its backstage rivalries. Throughout it all Constantinople is the star, and its rich smells, bustling streets and handsome buildings are beautifully evoked.

12/07/2010

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The Guardian

Tom Holland

The reasons for [the] schism in the imperial church were complex, and Duffy has muddied the theological subtleties that underlay them horrendously; but ultimately, this hardly matters. What she does get spot on, and to the immense benefit of her novel, is the life-changing potency of Christianity in the Byzantine world: the way in which it could indeed bring about spectacular prodigies of repentence ... if her Theodora is convincing both as whore and empress, then that is due largely to her credibility as penitent.

17/07/2010

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The Daily Telegraph

Sinclair McKay

This is a story rich in colour, texture and taste, told in a fleet-footed narrative.

29/06/2010

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The Sunday Times

Elizabeth Buchan

[Theodora's] extraordinary transformation to Monophysite Christian is a splendid subject, traced with energy and much juicy detail. There are some quibbles: whether a 6th-century woman would refer to “dehydration” or reflect that “the inner sceptic which stood her in such stead as a child…was washed away” is debatable. But for scope, energy and complete lack of sentimentality, Theodora is admirable.

06/06/2010

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