The Short Second Life of Bree Tanner

Stephenie Meyer

The Short Second Life of Bree Tanner

This novella tells the story of Bree Tanner, a vampire first introduced in Eclipse, and the darker side of the world she inhabits. It chronicles the journey of members of the newborn vampire army from their preparations to close in on Bella Swan and the Cullen family to its shocking conclusion. 1.9 out of 5 based on 7 reviews
The Short Second Life of Bree Tanner

Omniscore:

Classification Fiction
Genre Horror & Ghost Stories, Children's & Teenage
Format Hardback
Pages 192
RRP £11.99
Date of Publication June 2010
ISBN 978-1907410369
Publisher Atom
 

This novella tells the story of Bree Tanner, a vampire first introduced in Eclipse, and the darker side of the world she inhabits. It chronicles the journey of members of the newborn vampire army from their preparations to close in on Bella Swan and the Cullen family to its shocking conclusion.

Reviews

The Spectator

Cressida Connolly

The prose is not the finest, but Meyer spins a good yarn. Anyone interested to see why she’s such a sensation might prefer to read this short book than wade through the much bulkier Twilight volumes.

16/06/2010

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The Sunday Telegraph

Michael Simkins

Despite my cynical middle-aged sensibilities, I still found myself turning the pages faster than a vampire scenting blood. If it didn’t sound so middle-aged I’d even describe it as a rattling good read.

20/06/2010

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The Washington Post

Monica Hesse

...as far as character development goes, "Bree" bests the rest of "Twilight." Bree and love interest Diego talk and act like real (undead) teens exploring a crush, as opposed to Edward and Bella's pathological obsessi-love that defines the other novels. Meyer's dialogue is more believable here than almost anywhere else in Twi-world. This, it turns out, is the problem. Fans do not come to Stephenie Meyer for reality. We come to her for passion, for yearning, for adoration mixed with anguish and then shaken to a tizzy.

06/06/2010

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The Sunday Times

Nicolette Jones

Bree’s teenage voice is convincing, but it is hard to sympathise with a wanton killer who feeds off human “dregs” (prostitutes, the homeless), even if it is all a metaphor for teenage anger. As for the prose style — well, that was never the point of reading this series, so the Twihards won’t be disappointed.

13/06/2010

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The Guardian

Imogen Russell Williams

Its few promising moments – Bree's pleasure when no humans interrupt a special moment with Diego, because "all the screaming would have ruined the mood", a chillingly thorough massacre of a whole ferry-load of people – are insufficient to redeem it from being woefully, leaden-footedly pedestrian throughout.

05/06/2010

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The Times

Amanda Craig

Sadly, The Short Second Life of Bree Tanner never makes you care about Bree, either in life or unlife. There is a dark story to be told about all the abused teenagers who disappear. But to make a story about the human “dregs” that the vampires both come from and feed on would take more imagination, passion and style than Meyer’s talent can summon.

07/06/2010

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The Daily Telegraph

Philip Womack

Sometimes Meyer accidentally channels PG Wodehouse: “A couple of kids temporarily lost limbs”, or “the breeze turned helpfully gentle”. At others, Napoleon Dynamite crops up: “Vampires with skillzzz.” When the vampire army attacks a passenger ship, it’s Enid Blyton: “That was amazing – three cheers for Riley!” shouts one of them as they sit surrounded by bloodied and gutted corpses. This is a strange, chaotic, even tedious book, which you cannot read if you don’t know the series, and if you do know it, won’t enlighten you one bit.

11/06/2010

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