The Last Werewolf

Glen Duncan

The Last Werewolf

One last full moon — then it will all be over. Jacob Marlowe has lost the will to live. For two hundred years he has wandered the world, enslaved by his lunatic appetites and tormented by the memory of his first and most monstrous crime. Now, the last of his kind, he knows he cannot go on. But as Jake counts down to suicide, a violent murder and an extraordinary meeting plunge him straight back into the desperate pursuit of life — and love. 4.1 out of 5 based on 6 reviews
The Last Werewolf

Omniscore:

Classification Fiction
Genre Horror & Ghost Stories, Science Fiction & Fantasy
Format Hardback
Pages 336
RRP £14.99
Date of Publication April 2011
ISBN 978-1847679444
Publisher Canongate
 

One last full moon — then it will all be over. Jacob Marlowe has lost the will to live. For two hundred years he has wandered the world, enslaved by his lunatic appetites and tormented by the memory of his first and most monstrous crime. Now, the last of his kind, he knows he cannot go on. But as Jake counts down to suicide, a violent murder and an extraordinary meeting plunge him straight back into the desperate pursuit of life — and love.

Reviews

The Independent on Sunday

Robert Epstein

It is a horror that never shies from the human side of lycanthropy; it is a disquisition on the nature of werewolf stories; it is a sublime study in literary elegance. It is bloody (and) brilliant.

03/04/2011

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The Observer

Alice Fisher

In the early chapters the reader is presented with an intellectual exploration of monstrosity, and of how human nature adapts to committing atrocities. It's an interesting exercise: wolves have been woefully neglected by popular culture of late in favour of vampires and zombies. That said, it's a joy when the second half of the book reveals itself to be an action thriller ... monstrously good fun.

10/04/2011

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The Times

Kate Saunders

Yes, really — the narrator is a werewolf, the film rights have already been optioned by Ridley Scott and the publishers are comparing the author with Stephen King. But the novel is strangely better than these facts suggest; sexy, funny, blisteringly intelligent, and without a hint of Twilight ... Duncan is the cleverest literary horror merchant since Bram Stoker.

02/04/2011

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The Guardian

Steven Poole

… like an updated version of Dracula, only for werewolves, and as rewritten by Bret Easton Ellis. As though in reproof of the plague of twee paranormal romances aimed at "young adults", Duncan effectively says: here we go, this is a story about monsters, so let's see how much sex and violence you can take. The answer is an awful lot, when it's done this artfully.

30/04/2011

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The Scotsman

Paul Cockburn

... you might well wonder what a praised literary novelist like Glen Duncan is doing writing about werewolves and vampires. He's having fun, for starters ... But Duncan also recognises and shows us the werewolf's true symbolic power, not simply as a generic metaphor for male lust or innate animal instincts, but of individual self-understanding

03/05/2011

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The Sunday Times

Phil Baker

Slick as a pop video, with high-octane poetic prose, this is state-of-the-art schlock … The Last Werewolf is a deliberately ugly book, right down to its emphasis on the way Jake doesn’t just enjoy human flesh but relishes the fear and despair of his victims.

17/04/2011

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