Shambling Towards Hiroshima

James Morrow

Shambling Towards Hiroshima

In the tradition of Godzilla as both a playful romp and a parable of the dawn of the nuclear era, this original satire blends the destruction of World War II with the halcyon pleasure of monster movies. In the summer of 1945 war is reigning in the Pacific Rim, while in the U.S. Syms Thorley continues his life as a B-movie actor. But the U.S. Navy would like to use Thorley in their top-secret Knickerbocker Project, putting the finishing touches on the ultimate biological weapon: a breed of gigantic, fire-breathing, mutant iguanas. Thorley is to don a rubber suit that will transform him into the merciless Gorgantis and star in a film that simulates the destruction of a miniature Japan - if the demonstration succeeds, the Japanese will surrender, sparing thousands of lives; if it fails, the mutant lizards will be unleashed. This is a conspiratorial secret history of a war, a weapon, and an unlikely hero who will have to give the most convincing performance of his life. 4.0 out of 5 based on 1 reviews
Shambling Towards Hiroshima

Omniscore:

Classification Fiction
Genre Science Fiction & Fantasy
Format Paperback
Pages 192
RRP £12.50
Date of Publication February 2009
ISBN 978-1892391841
Publisher Tachyon
 

In the tradition of Godzilla as both a playful romp and a parable of the dawn of the nuclear era, this original satire blends the destruction of World War II with the halcyon pleasure of monster movies. In the summer of 1945 war is reigning in the Pacific Rim, while in the U.S. Syms Thorley continues his life as a B-movie actor. But the U.S. Navy would like to use Thorley in their top-secret Knickerbocker Project, putting the finishing touches on the ultimate biological weapon: a breed of gigantic, fire-breathing, mutant iguanas. Thorley is to don a rubber suit that will transform him into the merciless Gorgantis and star in a film that simulates the destruction of a miniature Japan - if the demonstration succeeds, the Japanese will surrender, sparing thousands of lives; if it fails, the mutant lizards will be unleashed. This is a conspiratorial secret history of a war, a weapon, and an unlikely hero who will have to give the most convincing performance of his life.

Reviews

The Guardian

Keith Brooke

...a smart and wry portrayal of a 1940s Hollywood that never quite existed... Thorley's memoir is both funny and touching, and ends as an impassioned plea for global sanity. Few authors could successfully combine politics, humour and the line "We can thank our lucky stars that Hitler never got the lizard", but Morrow pulls it off with aplomb.

14/02/2009

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