Zima Blue and Other Stories

Alastair Reynolds

Zima Blue and Other Stories

Reynolds' pursuit of truth is not limited to wide-angle star smashing - not that stars don't get pulverised when one character is gifted (or cursed) with an awful weapon by the legendary Merlin. Reynolds' protagonists find themselves in situations of betrayal, whether by a loved one's accidental death, as in 'Signal to Noise', or by a trusted wartime authority, in 'Spirey and the Queen'. His fertile imagination can resurrect Elton John on Mars in 'Understanding Space and Time' or make prophets of the human condition out of pool-cleaning robots in the title story. But overall, the stories in 'Zima Blue' represent a more optimistic take on humanity's future, a view that says there may be wars, there may be catastrophes and cosmic errors, but something human will still survive. 4.8 out of 5 based on 2 reviews
Zima Blue and Other Stories

Omniscore:

Classification Fiction
Genre Science Fiction & Fantasy, Short Stories
Format Hardback
Pages 416
RRP £18.99
Date of Publication April 2009
ISBN 978-0575084056
Publisher Gollancz
 

Reynolds' pursuit of truth is not limited to wide-angle star smashing - not that stars don't get pulverised when one character is gifted (or cursed) with an awful weapon by the legendary Merlin. Reynolds' protagonists find themselves in situations of betrayal, whether by a loved one's accidental death, as in 'Signal to Noise', or by a trusted wartime authority, in 'Spirey and the Queen'. His fertile imagination can resurrect Elton John on Mars in 'Understanding Space and Time' or make prophets of the human condition out of pool-cleaning robots in the title story. But overall, the stories in 'Zima Blue' represent a more optimistic take on humanity's future, a view that says there may be wars, there may be catastrophes and cosmic errors, but something human will still survive.

Reviews

The Daily Telegraph

Peter Ingham

The stories concern displacement, exile and Reynolds’s enduring concern with the place of humanity in the vastness of the universe. He understands the virtues required for sci-fi short fiction – spare writing and a strong central idea that does not outstay its welcome. For anyone wanting to test the waters, Zima Blue is an excellent gateway.

15/04/2009

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The Guardian

Eric Brown

[Reynolds is] noted for big novels that combine storylines strung out across aeons with mind-blowing cosmological theory, and he's just as successful at presenting these concepts in the more constraining form of the short story.

04/04/2009

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