Boneland

Alan Garner

Boneland

'Boneland' concludes the story that began over fifty years ago in 'The Weirdstone of Brisingamen'. If the sleeper wakes, the dream dies...Professor Colin Whisterfield spends his days at Jodrell Bank, using the radio telescope to look for his lost sister in the Pleiades. At the same time, and in another time, the Watcher cuts the rock and dances, to keep the sky above the earth and the stars flying. Colin can't remember; and he remembers too much. Before the age of twelve ... 3.7 out of 5 based on 6 reviews
Boneland

Omniscore:

Classification Fiction
Genre General Fiction, Science Fiction & Fantasy
Format Hardcover
Pages 149
RRP
Date of Publication August 2012
ISBN 978-0007463244
Publisher Fourth Estate
 

'Boneland' concludes the story that began over fifty years ago in 'The Weirdstone of Brisingamen'. If the sleeper wakes, the dream dies...Professor Colin Whisterfield spends his days at Jodrell Bank, using the radio telescope to look for his lost sister in the Pleiades. At the same time, and in another time, the Watcher cuts the rock and dances, to keep the sky above the earth and the stars flying. Colin can't remember; and he remembers too much. Before the age of twelve ...

Reviews

The Times

Neil Gaiman

Boneland is a realistic novel of landscape, inner and outer, past and present. It becomes a novel of the fantastic toward the end: perhaps old magics have risen to show Colin the way out, perhaps he has conjured them himself as he confronts his demons. I do not know if the conclusion makes sense if you have not read the first two books, and I am not entirely certain whether reading the first two books will make it easier to read this one. Boneland demands a lot of the reader, either way. But it returns more than it demands ... oneland is the strangest, but also the strongest, of Garner’s books.

08/09/2012

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The Daily Express

Sarah Kingsford

Anyone expecting dwarves, wizards and magical adventures for children would be disappointed with Boneland and possibly a little confused. There is much left unexplained. However, this is a novel for all the children who loved The Weirdstone Of Brisingamen but who have now grown up.

19/08/2012

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The Daily Telegraph

Philip Womack

Intercut with Colin’s tale, which is told in spare prose and obscure dialogue, is a prehistoric strand in which the last hominid of his kind seeks a female. These sections have an incantatory ring to them, as if Garner himself is invoking ancient spirits. Colin’s life is weirdly linked with the hominid; and, it also transpires, with Cadellin … Boneland hooks into the mind, haunting, provoking. Garner writes in the tradition of the folkloric bard: Ted Hughes, Robert Graves; a line of song and power that stretches back to the earliest days.

23/08/2012

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The Guardian

Ursula K Le Guin

Garner can count on the trust and admiration of many of his readers to see him through it, but my trust and admiration, though great, weren't always sufficient. No rereading has yet given me a clue to the meaning of the first eight lines of Boneland … Where all the teases and all the risks pay off, for me, is in the shadow-story of the man who "looked after the Edge" so long ago, the solitary artist-shaman of the ice age.

29/08/2012

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The Sunday Times

Philip Baker

Meg is barely believable as a therapist and, for a while, comes across more like the love interest in a pretentious thriller, until we finally discover that she is, indeed, no ordinary psychotherapist. The world of Boneland is not the more immediately enticing world of Garner’s earliest work, which had a fantasy charm akin to Tolkien or the Narnia books.

26/08/2012

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The Independent on Sunday

Amanda Craig

The bleak, spare descriptions of Colin's life are intercut with the kind of awkward dialogue last seen in 1970s John Fowles books. Interleaved with all this are passages similar to those in Garner's Thursbitch, about a prehistoric Watcher who maintains the balance of the universe by dancing and storytelling. Colin says his mistake was to mix myth and science when "they occupy different dimensions", and the same goes for this novel. Those likely to buy it are Garner's existing fans.

02/09/2012

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