The Twelve

Justin Cronin

The Twelve

THE TWELVE Death-row prisoners with nightmare pasts and no future. THE TWELVE Until they were selected for a secret experiment. THE TWELVE To create something more than human. THE TWELVE Now they are the future and humanity's worst nightmare has begun. THE TWELVE The epic sequel to THE PASSAGE 3.1 out of 5 based on 4 reviews
The Twelve

Omniscore:

Classification Fiction
Genre General Fiction, Science Fiction & Fantasy
Format Hardcover
Pages 592
RRP
Date of Publication October 2012
ISBN 978-0752897868
Publisher Orion
 

THE TWELVE Death-row prisoners with nightmare pasts and no future. THE TWELVE Until they were selected for a secret experiment. THE TWELVE To create something more than human. THE TWELVE Now they are the future and humanity's worst nightmare has begun. THE TWELVE The epic sequel to THE PASSAGE

The Twelve by Justin Cronin

Reviews

The Guardian

Roz Kaveney

Second volumes of trilogies have always to change the rules that the reader has come to accept – change our sense of who the antagonist is so that thrills and climaxes can be delivered before the eventual third volume's race to settle final accounts. Cronin has understood this well, but that is not all that there is to The Twelve – he deepens his portrait of his principals, the saintly Amy, Alicia whom infection and survival have honed into the sword of virtue and Peter, the ordinarily heroic man who has to cope with the two extraordinary women that he loves and fights alongside.

25/10/2012

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The New York Times

Joseph Salvatore

Putting us back at Year Zero may feel slightly regressive in a sequel of this scope, but Kittridge’s ordeal nonetheless enthralls. Though there’s nothing here quite like the artful and plaintive first third of The Passage, these human relationships remain well developed and emotionally affecting. And Cronin offers a few revelations that will ease the story more gently into the future.

26/10/2012

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The Sunday Times

Alison Flood

It is understandable that Cronin would want to fill in some back story, but taking more than 200 pages to get to the characters we really care about — the scattered survivors — is too long. Once he does, though, The Twelve becomes as exhilarating as The Passage ...

18/11/2012

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The Washington Post

Ron Charles

The ending of The Twelve delivers only a pale version of the thrilling climax of The Passage. And the whole story offers all the sexual tension of a Kansas-approved middle-school summer-reading book. What’s really missing, though, is that unsettling sense of the alienness of the future that Cronin conveyed so tremendously in his previous volume. The Twelve gives little sense of the weird transmutations of culture, faith and science that the next century will deliver whether or not we’re ravaged by vampires. Instead, we get buff paragons of bravery running around in tattered uniforms, firing big guns and blowing stuff up while spouting grandiose phrases about the survival of humanity.

09/10/2012

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