Great Works: 50 Paintings Explored

Tom Lubbock

Great Works: 50 Paintings Explored

Tom Lubbock was chief art critic of the Independent from 1997 until his death in 2011. This book collects articles from his popular Independent series: Great Works. 4.6 out of 5 based on 4 reviews
Great Works: 50 Paintings Explored

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre Art, Architecture & Photography
Format Hardback
Pages 216
RRP £18.99
Date of Publication October 2011
ISBN 978-0711232839
Publisher Frances Lincoln
 

Tom Lubbock was chief art critic of the Independent from 1997 until his death in 2011. This book collects articles from his popular Independent series: Great Works.

Reviews

The Evening Standard

Brian Sewell

Read at a sitting, this is an indigestible accumulation of maverick ideas but I could not put it down; it is pure Tom, playing as shrewd an observer of a painting as was Aldous Huxley, or honest fool, or schoolboy, or slippery Jesuit, all prompting argument — and argument with Tom prompts recollections and he is still alive.

06/10/2011

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The Independent on Sunday

Charles Darwent

… you often sense a frustration in Lubbock that his is the only voice allowed: "Come on," you hear him saying, "what do you think?". As befits their subject, the great works are oddly visual. I cannot read them without picturing the room in which their dialogue takes place: comfortable, a bit battered, filled, from time to time, with Lubbock's explosive guffaws; his jabbed forefinger emphasising a triumphant "Exactly!".

09/10/2011

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The Sunday Times

Waldemar Januszczak

Unlike most fields of creative endeavour, art writing seems never to happen in waves ... There is no equivalent in art writing of impressionism or surrealism or even the Mersey boom. Instead, you get the occasional voice with a distinctive viewpoint making itself heard above the melee: a Vasari, a Ruskin, a Greenberg. Tom Lubbock was one of those. Not in heft — he never wrote anything remotely big enough actually to alter the course of art — but in distinctiveness.

25/09/2011

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The Observer

Alexander Linklater

...Great Works deepens a neat journalistic technique into a profound way of seeing. Why did Alfred Hitchcock, in his 1941 film, Suspicion, put a light inside the glass of milk in Cary Grant's hand? And what does this little special effect tell you about Francisco de Zurbarán's Still Life with Jars, painted in 1635? Lubbock's unlikely juxtaposition lights up not only a film and a painting, but the very idea of the illusion of light in art.

08/04/2012

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