Winner Take All: China's Race for Resources and What it Means for Us

Dambisa Moyo

Winner Take All: China's Race for Resources and What it Means for Us

Our planet's resources are running out. The media bombards us with constant warnings of impending shortages of fossil fuels, minerals, arable land, and water and the political Armageddon that will result as insatiable global demand far outstrips supply. But how true is this picture? In Winner Take All, Dambisa Moyo examines what really is at stake. Examining the operations of commodity markets and the geopolitical shifts they have triggered, she reveals the hard facts behind the insatiable global demand for economic growth. China, Moyo argues, has embarked on one of the greatest commodity rushes in history. Tracing its breathtaking quest for resources - from Africa to Latin America, North America to Europe - she examines the impact it is having on us all, and its profound implications for our future. What, Moyo asks, will be the financial and human effects of all this - and is large-scale resource conflict inevitable or avoidable? 2.0 out of 5 based on 5 reviews
Winner Take All: China's Race for Resources and What it Means for Us

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre Business, Finance & Law, Society, Politics & Philosophy
Format Hardback
Pages 272
RRP
Date of Publication June 2012
ISBN 978-1846145032
Publisher Allen Lane
 

Our planet's resources are running out. The media bombards us with constant warnings of impending shortages of fossil fuels, minerals, arable land, and water and the political Armageddon that will result as insatiable global demand far outstrips supply. But how true is this picture? In Winner Take All, Dambisa Moyo examines what really is at stake. Examining the operations of commodity markets and the geopolitical shifts they have triggered, she reveals the hard facts behind the insatiable global demand for economic growth. China, Moyo argues, has embarked on one of the greatest commodity rushes in history. Tracing its breathtaking quest for resources - from Africa to Latin America, North America to Europe - she examines the impact it is having on us all, and its profound implications for our future. What, Moyo asks, will be the financial and human effects of all this - and is large-scale resource conflict inevitable or avoidable?

Dead Aid by Dambisa Moyo

Reviews

The Financial Times

John Gapper

Her argument that the world faces a Malthusian future of shortages of everything from water to food and metals such as copper comes as the copper price has fallen by 20 per cent in a year and as mining companies worry that the “supercycle” in commodities is over. Still, it takes more than a temporary softening of the Chinese economy and weakening in its demand for commodities to disprove Moyo’s thesis ... If we do have to face facts, Moyo is our woman ... She sketches some possible remedies — raising energy taxes or cutting back military spending, for example. But if, as she says, the villains are “self-interest and myopia”, then a solution is remote.

23/06/2012

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The Independent

Hamish McRae

This is not an elegantly written book. Her technique is to pepper her assertions with a mass of statistics that often seem scattered like a condiment onto the meal. And there is a hectoring tone that becomes wearing. But she does go to the heart of the issue: what China does over resources is profoundly important, and that deserves our attention.

30/06/2012

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The Observer

Jonathan Fenby

… this book's overall message is one which certainly deserves greater attention that it generally receives. But Moyo's account of the principal character in the drama she sets out is too limited and needs to be set in context. She fails to provide the essential domestic component in China's resources demand. For instance, the book takes China's increasing demand for food and land on which to grow it as an external issue whereas it stems in considerable part from the inadequacies of the country's domestic agriculture and the policy priorities of successive governments.

01/07/2012

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The Sunday Telegraph

David Blair

… a flawed and frustrating book, simplistic, poorly written, careless with facts and largely devoid of originality ... There is no point approaching a subject of this importance unless you are willing to do some original reporting. Aside from one paragraph on page 90, which describes a scene at an unnamed international conference, nothing in Winner Take All suggests that Moyo has travelled anywhere, seen anything for herself, or interviewed anyone.

19/06/2012

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The Times

Oliver Kamm

She is technically well qualified, yet her book is alarmist, ill-informed and intellectually irresponsible. Nuance and subtlety may be too much to expect in a populist prophecy of “unprecedented catastrophe”, yet Moyo expresses near-certainty about things she cannot possibly know. Her analysis is misleading and her conclusions are a danger to the quality of public debate. If you read only one book on international economics, make sure it isn’t this one.

18/06/2012

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