A Child in Palestine: The Cartoons of Naji al-Ali

Naji al-Ali

A Child in Palestine: The Cartoons of Naji al-Ali

Naji al-Ali grew up in the Palestinian refugee camp of Ain al-Hilweh in the south Lebanese city of Sidon, where his gift for drawing was discovered by the Palestinian poet Ghassan Kanafani in the late 1950s. Early the following decade he left for Kuwait, embarking on a thirty-year career that would see his cartoons published daily in newspapers from Cairo to Beirut, London to Paris. Resolutely independent and unaligned to any political party, Naji al-Ali strove to speak to and for the ordinary Arab people; the pointed satire of his stark, symbolic cartoons brought him widespread renown. Through his most celebrated creation, the witness-child Handala, al-Ali criticized the brutality of Israeli occupation, the venality and corruption of the regimes in the region, and the suffering of the Palestinian people, earning him many powerful enemies and the soubriquet the Palestinian Malcolm X. 4.0 out of 5 based on 1 reviews
A Child in Palestine: The Cartoons of Naji al-Ali

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre Comics & Graphic Novels
Format Paperback
Pages 120
RRP £9.99
Date of Publication June 2009
ISBN 978-1844673650
Publisher Verso
 

Naji al-Ali grew up in the Palestinian refugee camp of Ain al-Hilweh in the south Lebanese city of Sidon, where his gift for drawing was discovered by the Palestinian poet Ghassan Kanafani in the late 1950s. Early the following decade he left for Kuwait, embarking on a thirty-year career that would see his cartoons published daily in newspapers from Cairo to Beirut, London to Paris. Resolutely independent and unaligned to any political party, Naji al-Ali strove to speak to and for the ordinary Arab people; the pointed satire of his stark, symbolic cartoons brought him widespread renown. Through his most celebrated creation, the witness-child Handala, al-Ali criticized the brutality of Israeli occupation, the venality and corruption of the regimes in the region, and the suffering of the Palestinian people, earning him many powerful enemies and the soubriquet the Palestinian Malcolm X.

Reviews

The Guardian

Michel Faber

...while it can't have been easy for the editors of A Child in Palestine to choose a few dozen cartoons from among the thousands that al-Ali produced, I can't help seeing a political agenda behind their decision to favour the more militant ones at the expense of so many of his most awesomely sad and tender images... this book will have two legacies. First, it will introduce British readers to al-Ali's formidable talent, albeit with a selection that doesn't do full justice to his greatness. Second, and very sadly, it may serve as documentary proof that the sword is mightier than the pen.

11/07/2009

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