MetaMaus

Art Spiegelman

MetaMaus

MAUS is widely renowned as one of the greatest pieces of art and literature ever written about the Holocaust. It is adored by readers and studied in colleges and universities all over the world. But what led Art Spiegelman to tell his father's story in the first place? Why did he choose to depict the Jews as mice? How could a comic book confront the terror and brutality of the worst atrocity of the twentieth century? To celebrate the 25th anniversary of the book's first publication, MetaMAUS, prepared by the author, is a vital companion to the classic text and includes never-before-seen sketches, rough and alternate drafts, family and reference photos, notebook and diary entries and the transcript of his interviews with his father Vladek as well as a long interview with Art, in which he discusses the book's extraordinary history and origins. The book includes a brand new DVD packed with extra images, video and commentary. 4.0 out of 5 based on 4 reviews
MetaMaus

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre Comics & Graphic Novels
Format Hardback
Pages 300
RRP £25.00
Date of Publication November 2011
ISBN 978-0670916832
Publisher Viking
 

MAUS is widely renowned as one of the greatest pieces of art and literature ever written about the Holocaust. It is adored by readers and studied in colleges and universities all over the world. But what led Art Spiegelman to tell his father's story in the first place? Why did he choose to depict the Jews as mice? How could a comic book confront the terror and brutality of the worst atrocity of the twentieth century? To celebrate the 25th anniversary of the book's first publication, MetaMAUS, prepared by the author, is a vital companion to the classic text and includes never-before-seen sketches, rough and alternate drafts, family and reference photos, notebook and diary entries and the transcript of his interviews with his father Vladek as well as a long interview with Art, in which he discusses the book's extraordinary history and origins. The book includes a brand new DVD packed with extra images, video and commentary.

"Why Mice?" | Art Spiegelman | NYRBlog

Reviews

The Financial Times

Simon Schama

Does this opera of self-importance — Spiegelman, the Art in the Mirror — not undercut the greatness of the original work just a tad? The answer, surprisingly, is: no. MetaMaus is not a self-indulgent MegaMaus. Its tone is often drolly self-critical in the vein of Woody Allen’s insistence (quoted by Spiegelman), that “I am not a self-hating Jew. I just hate myself.” MetaMaus is a sustained, morally serious and strenuously intelligent attempt to answer — in Spiegelman’s typically multi-directional form — the three key questions raised by the original: why relate (yet again) the Holocaust; why do it with animals; and why in comic book form?

18/11/2011

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The Evening Standard

Nicola Shulman

In Britain we have very little sense of cartoons as a medium for the serious or profound, and consistently underestimate our own cartoon geniuses like Raymond Briggs, Ronald Searle or Posy Simmonds. Spiegelman's dissection of the formal elements of his work is therefore particularly enlightening.

24/11/2011

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The Daily Telegraph

Kasia Boddy

The effect of this great assemblage is complicated. On the one hand, it consolidates Maus’s status as a canonical work, about which we need to know everything, and emphasises its claim to historical testimony (Spiegelman complained to The New York Times when Maus was included on the fiction bestseller list.) On the other hand, however, the almost overwhelming presence of all this stuff emphasises that history is far from a straightforward retrieval of “facts”, but rather involves a complex process of accumulation, sifting and construction. Still, that’s something any fan already knows: Maus itself was pretty meta all along.

25/11/2011

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The New York Times

Dwight Garner

Shaggily engaging … The author is instructively apoplectic about the idea that “Maus,” because it is a comic book, is somehow “Auschwitz for Beginners,” a sugarcoated pill ... Bear in mind that “MetaMaus” does not contain the actual text of “Maus,” though it can be read on the DVD. This is not a book to present to someone who has not read the original.

12/10/2011

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