The Blaze of Obscurity: The TV Years

Clive James

The Blaze of Obscurity: The TV Years

For many people, Clive James will always be a TV presenter first and foremost, and a writer second - this despite the fact that his adventures with the written word took place before, during and after his time on the small screen. Nevertheless, for those who remember clips of Japanese endurance gameshows and Egyptian soap operas, Clive reinventing the news or interviewing Hefner and Hepburn, Polanski and Pavarotti, Clive's 'Postcards' from Kenya, Shanghai and Dallas, or Clive James Racing Driver, Clive's rightful place does seem to be right there - on the box, in our homes, and almost one of the family. 4.5 out of 5 based on 2 reviews
The Blaze of Obscurity: The TV Years

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre Essays, Journals & Letters
Format Hardback
Pages 288
RRP £17.99
Date of Publication October 2009
ISBN 978-0330457361
Publisher Picador
 

For many people, Clive James will always be a TV presenter first and foremost, and a writer second - this despite the fact that his adventures with the written word took place before, during and after his time on the small screen. Nevertheless, for those who remember clips of Japanese endurance gameshows and Egyptian soap operas, Clive reinventing the news or interviewing Hefner and Hepburn, Polanski and Pavarotti, Clive's 'Postcards' from Kenya, Shanghai and Dallas, or Clive James Racing Driver, Clive's rightful place does seem to be right there - on the box, in our homes, and almost one of the family.

Reviews

The Observer

Robert Yates

These are authored essays of fantastic wit and poise. Evident in his account of these years is James's enthusiasm for acquiring new skills in melding image and word – economy in composition, the rhythm of a good edit. He also delivers some sharp pen portraits: Alan Yentob, the BBC's executive as maverick, he describes as ever-elusive, "spear-fishing with Marlon Brando" or "doing a deal with Zeffirelli for an all-dwarf production of La forza del destino".

25/10/2009

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The Sunday Times

Roland White

As James cannot find it within himself to write a dull paragraph, his book is an entertaining read. But there’s no hiding the fact that the material on showbusiness and television has been well worked elsewhere. I enjoyed it, and learnt a thing or two about television, but found myself hankering for the wooden carts of his boyhood.

11/10/2009

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