The Art of Conversation

Catherine Blyth

The Art of Conversation

Every day we use our mobiles and computers to communicate, but ironically we are losing touch with face-to-face talk. Catherine Blyth reveals the endless possibilities of conversation and shows that when it works it can come close to heaven. With examples from Elizabeth I to Tommy Cooper, courtesans to nomads, The Art of Conversation is full of tips on listening, talking shop and surviving conversational bores. Be it sharing a joke with a stranger, sparking a new idea or just letting off steam with a friend, there are infinite adventures to be had if you break the ice and say hello . . . 3.5 out of 5 based on 1 reviews
The Art of Conversation

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre Family & Lifestyle
Format Hardback
Pages 304
RRP £12.99
Date of Publication November 2008
ISBN 978-0719521812
Publisher John Murray
 

Every day we use our mobiles and computers to communicate, but ironically we are losing touch with face-to-face talk. Catherine Blyth reveals the endless possibilities of conversation and shows that when it works it can come close to heaven. With examples from Elizabeth I to Tommy Cooper, courtesans to nomads, The Art of Conversation is full of tips on listening, talking shop and surviving conversational bores. Be it sharing a joke with a stranger, sparking a new idea or just letting off steam with a friend, there are infinite adventures to be had if you break the ice and say hello . . .

Reviews

The Observer

Elizabeth Day

Blyth is at her best when casually revealing valuable nuggets of information. In a section on the value of silence, we learn that when Solon, the founder of Athenian democracy, was asked to remove the best and worst bits of a sacrificed animal in a test of wits, he selected a single item: the tongue. Sometimes, the book's structure feels unnecessarily limiting, as if it could not quite decide whether to be a self-help manual or a chatty polemic of the Eats, Shoots and Leaves variety. There are sporadic attempts to reduce complex and subtle ideas to an equation, such as 'Attention + Interest = Conversation' or 'Incongruity x Credulity = Surprise!' as if we are sitting through a powerpoint presentation at a motivational management seminar. This sits uneasily with Blyth's natural tone of elegant drollery.

09/11/2008

Read Full Review


©2013 The Omnivore