Backwards in High Heels: The Impossible Art of Being Female

Tania Kindersley, Sarah Vine

Backwards in High Heels: The Impossible Art of Being Female

The world is a fraught place for the contemporary female. Working mothers are still expected to make their children's costumes for the school play, despite the fact that home economics was abolished in the Seventies; we're told it's not looks but brains that count, and yet if we dare to leave the house looking vaguely our age we're made to feel like failures; women's magazines run earnest articles about the evils of size 00 culture, only to feature models with hips like 10-year-old boys a few pages later; we pay the same level of taxation as men, and yet on average we earn 25% less. So, this book - a book for women who never got around to perfecting the art of domestic divinity but would quite like to be able to cook supper for six without having a nervous breakdown; who never quite mastered Cosmo's 101 ways to please your man, but don't want the embarrassment, not to say inconvenience, of him running off with a 19-year-old Russian supermodel. It's your mother, your best friend, your guru and your shrink wrapped up in book form, with jokes. It's the antidote to every stupid, boring, reductive magazine article you've ever read, or every silly, hair-twirling, chick lit confection about girls called Arabella who marry bankers and live in Gstaad. It's for women who love their children but don't want them to run their lives; and for women who love their lives and won't have them run by children. It's about revising expectations, exploding myths and generally dealing with all that life, love and other people have to throw at you. 4.8 out of 5 based on 3 reviews
Backwards in High Heels: The Impossible Art of Being Female

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre Family & Lifestyle
Format Hardback
Pages 256
RRP £14.99
Date of Publication February 2009
ISBN 978-0007273836
Publisher Fourth Estate
 

The world is a fraught place for the contemporary female. Working mothers are still expected to make their children's costumes for the school play, despite the fact that home economics was abolished in the Seventies; we're told it's not looks but brains that count, and yet if we dare to leave the house looking vaguely our age we're made to feel like failures; women's magazines run earnest articles about the evils of size 00 culture, only to feature models with hips like 10-year-old boys a few pages later; we pay the same level of taxation as men, and yet on average we earn 25% less. So, this book - a book for women who never got around to perfecting the art of domestic divinity but would quite like to be able to cook supper for six without having a nervous breakdown; who never quite mastered Cosmo's 101 ways to please your man, but don't want the embarrassment, not to say inconvenience, of him running off with a 19-year-old Russian supermodel. It's your mother, your best friend, your guru and your shrink wrapped up in book form, with jokes. It's the antidote to every stupid, boring, reductive magazine article you've ever read, or every silly, hair-twirling, chick lit confection about girls called Arabella who marry bankers and live in Gstaad. It's for women who love their children but don't want them to run their lives; and for women who love their lives and won't have them run by children. It's about revising expectations, exploding myths and generally dealing with all that life, love and other people have to throw at you.

Reviews

The Observer

Stephanie Merritt

...magnificent... Vine and Kindersley pay their reader the compliment of assuming she has read something other than Grazia magazine during her years on the planet. Their guide... is infused with wit, warmth and wisdom and a refreshing dose of common sense.

08/02/2009

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The Sunday Times

India Knight

I love this book. It's one of those rare beasts that you want to earmark, scribble in and rush out and buy for all your girlfriends. It contains within its pages everything an intelligent woman might want to know about the nuances of every conceivable topic: big subjects, such as love, motherhood, feminism, politics, grief, ageing, as well as what stupid people often patronisingly refer to as the “shallower” stuff.

22/02/2009

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The Daily Telegraph

Bryony Gordon

By trying to cover all facets of 21st-century life, the authors risk coming across as know-it-alls, but Vine and Kindersley manage not to fall into that trap. They are spunky and aware of their limitations – which are, of course, ours too. Indeed, Backwards is almost an anti-self-help book, in that it believes that women are perfectly capable of helping themselves without the aid of a manual.

24/03/2009

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