The Idle Parent: Why Less Means More When Raising Kids

Tom Hodgkinson

The Idle Parent: Why Less Means More When Raising Kids

In The Idle Parent Tom Hodgkinson provides a revolutionary and wholly sensible approach to childcare, based on the idea of D.H. Lawrence and many others that the best thing we can do for children is to leave them alone. Of course, this doesn’t mean that we should completely neglect them, but rather that we should provide them with the space and time to grow up self-reliant, confident, happy and free. To do so we need to stop worrying and start nurturing the natural instincts towards creativity and independence in every child. And in so doing we will find ourselves becoming happier and better parents. 3.8 out of 5 based on 3 reviews
The Idle Parent: Why Less Means More When Raising Kids

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre Family & Lifestyle
Format Hardback
Pages 320
RRP £14.99
Date of Publication March 2009
ISBN 978-0241143735
Publisher Hamish Hamilton
 

In The Idle Parent Tom Hodgkinson provides a revolutionary and wholly sensible approach to childcare, based on the idea of D.H. Lawrence and many others that the best thing we can do for children is to leave them alone. Of course, this doesn’t mean that we should completely neglect them, but rather that we should provide them with the space and time to grow up self-reliant, confident, happy and free. To do so we need to stop worrying and start nurturing the natural instincts towards creativity and independence in every child. And in so doing we will find ourselves becoming happier and better parents.

Reviews

The Sunday Times

Matt Rudd

...the anti-materialist ideals of his first book, How to Be Idle, are re-rehearsed; but now, in the context of children, they seem entirely irrefutable... There are some irritations (the defence of public schools is gratingly elitist) and a little too much Darling Buds of May-style rosiness from his idyllic blimming farm. But even allowing for the fact that Hodgkinson has only done what so many other middle-class rat-race-escapees are doing — sodding off to the West country to breed pigs and crow about it — he is right on almost everything.

08/03/2009

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The New Statesman

Zoe Williams

I suspect that if you aren’t already well disposed towards the author, you might feel irked by the “Look at my marvellous life and the tremendous way I do things” top-note to everything. But overall, the book is funny, meaningful, likeable and sometimes effortlessly wise: “Whining in children results from their sense that they are seen as encumbrances and have nothing to offer. Only the powerless whine. So make them useful!”

02/04/2009

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The Guardian

Ian Sansom

His laissez-faire, anarcho-Tory approach to parenting is all very well for someone living in rural Devon. On a farm. With an au pair. And a pony. And a lovely rural primary school with just 40 children down the road. And the means to pay for private education when they get older - Hodgkinson is particularly keen on Summerhill and Eton... But these blindspots are the quirks of the free spirit: Hodgkinson also advocates skateboarding, ukulele playing, camping and the drinking of beer.

04/04/2009

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