The Secret World of the Working Mother

Fiona Millar

The Secret World of the Working Mother

Fiona Millar, journalist and education campaigner, knows first hand that being a working mother involves managing childcare, work, laundry and countless other tasks, while striving to find the perfect work-life balance for her family. And she is not alone. Over 70 per cent of mothers with school-age children are in some form of work. In "The Secret World of the Working Mother", Millar draws on the experiences of women from all walks of life and circumstance, as well as her own, to examine the many challenges faced in the workplace and home. 3.0 out of 5 based on 4 reviews
The Secret World of the Working Mother

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre Family & Lifestyle
Format Paperback
Pages 288
RRP £12.99
Date of Publication March 2009
ISBN 978-0091924232
Publisher Vermilion
 

Fiona Millar, journalist and education campaigner, knows first hand that being a working mother involves managing childcare, work, laundry and countless other tasks, while striving to find the perfect work-life balance for her family. And she is not alone. Over 70 per cent of mothers with school-age children are in some form of work. In "The Secret World of the Working Mother", Millar draws on the experiences of women from all walks of life and circumstance, as well as her own, to examine the many challenges faced in the workplace and home.

Reviews

The Daily Telegraph

Cassandra Jardine

There’s no central argument here, apart from a resentment that working mothers get the blame when things go wrong... Since her own children have turned out fine, her conclusion is foregone: children will flourish if their working mothers have a strong initial bond with them, “good enough” childcare and a reasonable employer... This is a useful, reassuring book but its target audience may not have enough spare minutes in their over-crammed days to read it.

13/03/2009

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The Guardian

Ian Sansom

Large parts of the book consist of conversations with women facing similar struggles. But for some, the kind of worries and anxieties that Millar describes will seem, frankly, ludicrous or simply incomprehensible. "One nanny fact is irrefutable," she writes. "They can be very expensive. The £30,000 a year charged by some nannies in the south-east of England ... is often expected to be part of a more generous package which can include sole use of a car, self-contained accommodation and expensive foreign holidays."

04/04/2009

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The New Statesman

Zoe Williams

The stated intention is to normalise the problems of working motherhood, vent them in their rich variety, and solicit frankness from readers about their own situation with the book’s tone of acceptance. Quite possibly there are mothers out there who, feeling isolated, will find all of this useful. But I wanted more passion, more judgement, more personality, more agenda. Instead, The Secret World feels like a really long National Childbirth Trust meeting, without the biscuits.

02/04/2009

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The Observer

Viv Groskop

...what is shocking about this book is how conservative it is... Millar is convinced that we are in a mess - and it is only by being better organised and more efficient women that we will get out of it. I agree with this up to a point. But - I wanted to scream - what about fathers? Millar assumes that it's just not worth nagging them. This is, thank God, an outdated and pessimistic attitude.

08/03/2009

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