For Better For Worse, For Richer For Poorer

Damian Horner, Siobhan Horner

For Better For Worse, For Richer For Poorer

Damian Horner is scared that fifteen years in advertising have turned him into a bastard. As he approaches his fortieth birthday, he wants to see if he can be a good husband and a good father before it's too late. Siobhan, his wife, would like to find out too but has other worries. Do marriage and kids mean she's now trapped in a world of suburban domesticity? It takes a miserable day and a bottle of wine to change everything. Suddenly Damian and Siobhan decide to throw their lives in the air and escape to the French canals, taking with them their son Noah who is two years old and can barely talk, and their daughter India who is one and cannot walk. Told in two voices, we hear both sides of their story and get the whole truth as Damian and Siobhan describe coming to terms with themselves and their life on board an old fishing boat in France with no space, no fridge, no charts, no deadlines and no flushing toilet. 2.0 out of 5 based on 1 reviews
For Better For Worse, For Richer For Poorer

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre Family & Lifestyle, Travel
Format Hardback
Pages 352
RRP £12.99
Date of Publication June 2009
ISBN 978-0297854234
Publisher Weidenfeld & Nicolson
 

Damian Horner is scared that fifteen years in advertising have turned him into a bastard. As he approaches his fortieth birthday, he wants to see if he can be a good husband and a good father before it's too late. Siobhan, his wife, would like to find out too but has other worries. Do marriage and kids mean she's now trapped in a world of suburban domesticity? It takes a miserable day and a bottle of wine to change everything. Suddenly Damian and Siobhan decide to throw their lives in the air and escape to the French canals, taking with them their son Noah who is two years old and can barely talk, and their daughter India who is one and cannot walk. Told in two voices, we hear both sides of their story and get the whole truth as Damian and Siobhan describe coming to terms with themselves and their life on board an old fishing boat in France with no space, no fridge, no charts, no deadlines and no flushing toilet.

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Reviews

The Daily Mail

Sam Leith

It feels mean-spirited to point it out, because the Horners clearly have no idea of this, but they come across so smug in print you want to wring them both by the neck... their escape is straight out of the bag containing the gap-year existentialist, the trust-fund bohemian or the rat-racer who gives it up to raise chickens in a Norfolk cottage splashed with Farrow and Ball paint. No shame in that - but they don't half go on congratulating themselves on what free spirits they are.

26/06/2009

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