Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother

Amy Chua

Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother

Amy Chua's daughters, Sophia and Louisa (Lulu) were polite, interesting and helpful, they were two years ahead of their classmates in maths and had exceptional musical abilities. But Sophia and Lulu were never allowed to attend a sleepover, be in a school play, choose their own extracurricular activities, get any grade less than an A, and not be the #1 student in every subject (except gym and drama). And they had to practice their instruments for hours every day, as well as in school breaks and on family holidays. The Chinese-parenting model certainly seemed to produce results. But what happens when you do not tolerate disobedience and are confronted by a screaming child who would sooner freeze outside in the cold than be forced to play the piano? In Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother, Amy Chua relates her experiences raising her children the 'Chinese way'. 3.2 out of 5 based on 6 reviews
Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre Family & Lifestyle
Format Hardback
Pages 256
RRP £16.99
Date of Publication February 2011
ISBN 978-1408812679
Publisher Bloomsbury
 

Amy Chua's daughters, Sophia and Louisa (Lulu) were polite, interesting and helpful, they were two years ahead of their classmates in maths and had exceptional musical abilities. But Sophia and Lulu were never allowed to attend a sleepover, be in a school play, choose their own extracurricular activities, get any grade less than an A, and not be the #1 student in every subject (except gym and drama). And they had to practice their instruments for hours every day, as well as in school breaks and on family holidays. The Chinese-parenting model certainly seemed to produce results. But what happens when you do not tolerate disobedience and are confronted by a screaming child who would sooner freeze outside in the cold than be forced to play the piano? In Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother, Amy Chua relates her experiences raising her children the 'Chinese way'.

Read an extract from the book | NYTimes.com

Reviews

The Sunday Times

India Knight

...an exceptionally, knowingly funny book... for all its hilarious/hair-raising insights into how to raise terrifyingly over-accomplished children, [it] strikes me as ultimately being not so much about parenting methods as about the immigrant experience

16/01/2011

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The Washington Post

Elizabeth Chang

Readers will alternately gasp at and empathize with Chua's struggles and aspirations, all the while enjoying her writing, which, like her kid-rearing philosophy, is brisk, lively and no-holds-barred. This memoir raises intriguing, sometimes uncomfortable questions about love, pride, ambition, achievement and self-worth that will resonate among success-obsessed parents.

07/01/2011

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The Daily Telegraph

Cassandra Jardine

The story of her family is not only entertaining, it also raises questions about issues that trouble all parents: is there a best route to establishing good long-term relationships, how to balance guidance with freedom and, even: What is love?

20/01/2011

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The New York Times

Janet Maslin

...a diabolically well-packaged, highly readable screed ostensibly about the art of obsessive parenting. In truth, Ms. Chua’s memoir is about one little narcissist’s book-length search for happiness. And for all its quotable outbursts from Mama Grisly (the nickname was inevitable), it will gratify the same people who made a hit out of the granola-hearted Eat, Pray, Love.

19/01/2011

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The Financial Times

Isabel Berwick

A huge amount of vitriol has been heaped upon Chua, and she is self-admittedly cruel ... But Chua is also aware of her own ridiculousness, and her writing is very funny in places.

17/01/2011

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The Daily Mail

Jane Shilling

...one of the mysteries of this book is what Chua’s husband thought of it all. He shimmers about in the background, mute and good-natured. Perhaps the clue to his absence lies in Chua’s remark that ‘I ended up leaving out big chunks about Jed because it’s really his story to tell’. No doubt a matching memoir of fatherhood is on the way.

21/01/2011

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