The Slow Food Story: Politics and Pleasure

Geoff Andrews

The Slow Food Story: Politics and Pleasure

The Slow Food movement was set up in Italy as a response to the dominance of fast food chains, supermarkets and large-scale agribusiness. It seeks to defend what it calls 'the universal right to pleasure' and promotes an alternative approach to food production and consumption based on the promotion of 'good, clean and fair' local products. This is the first in-depth study of the fascinating politics of Slow Food, which in twenty years has grown into an international organisation with more than 80,000 members in over 100 countries. With its roots in the 1960s and 1970s counter-culture, Slow Food's distinctive politics lie in the unity between gastronomic pleasure and environmental responsibility. The movement crosses the left-right divide to embrace both the conservative desire to preserve traditional rural communities and an alternative 'virtuous' idea of globalisation. Geoff Andrews shows that the alternative future embodied in Slow Food extends to all aspects of modern life. The Slow Food Story presents an extensive new critique of fast-moving, work-obsessed contemporary capitalist culture. 3.0 out of 5 based on 2 reviews
The Slow Food Story: Politics and Pleasure

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre Food & Drink, Society, Politics & Philosophy
Format Paperback
Pages 224
RRP £14.99
Date of Publication July 2008
ISBN 978-0745327440
Publisher Pluto Press
 

The Slow Food movement was set up in Italy as a response to the dominance of fast food chains, supermarkets and large-scale agribusiness. It seeks to defend what it calls 'the universal right to pleasure' and promotes an alternative approach to food production and consumption based on the promotion of 'good, clean and fair' local products. This is the first in-depth study of the fascinating politics of Slow Food, which in twenty years has grown into an international organisation with more than 80,000 members in over 100 countries. With its roots in the 1960s and 1970s counter-culture, Slow Food's distinctive politics lie in the unity between gastronomic pleasure and environmental responsibility. The movement crosses the left-right divide to embrace both the conservative desire to preserve traditional rural communities and an alternative 'virtuous' idea of globalisation. Geoff Andrews shows that the alternative future embodied in Slow Food extends to all aspects of modern life. The Slow Food Story presents an extensive new critique of fast-moving, work-obsessed contemporary capitalist culture.

Reviews

The Guardian

Steven Poole

A thoughtful account of how politics came back to eating, from 1970s Italy and California to present-day Ludlow and further afield... Against the charge that it is "elitist" to nag poor people about buying cheap supermarket food, Andrews argues that only slow fooders really care about the growers, and that only such a wide-angle view of food, from field to table, is politically and ecologically respectable.

29/11/2008

Read Full Review


The New Statesman

Jonathan Meades

The unforced pan-European heterogeneity, combined with Andrews's avoidance of generalisation, makes his survey of this broadest of churches piecemeal. Though it is moot whether "survey" is the appropriate word for so partial a work: much of it is chummy propaganda. Andrews is an uncritically enthusiastic convert and true believer in a gastronomically correct litany of practices and products which are, needless to say, organic, ethical, fair-trade, green, sustainable, biodiverse and so on. All of which is unexceptionable, all of which conforms to the soft-left orthodoxy of open-necked plutocracy with a caring smile.

04/12/2008

Read Full Review


©2013 The Omnivore