Eat Your Heart Out: Why the Food Business Is Bad for the Planet and Your Health

Felicity Lawrence

Eat Your Heart Out: Why the Food Business Is Bad for the Planet and Your Health

Why is it...That almost all the processed foods we eat contain the same handful of ingredients? That these handful of ingredients are produced by only a handful of multi-nationals? That some cereals contain more salt per serving than a packet of crisps? That served with milk, sugar and raisins, some cardboard packets have been said to be more nutritious than the cereal they contain? That there are half the number of dairy farms in the UK than there were 10 years ago? That over the same period the turnover of the top 20 global dairy corporations has increased by 60%? That over 60% of all processed foods in Britain contain soya? That the UK government's Committee on the Toxicity of Food judged that eating soya could have hormone-disrupting effects? That in 1970, a hundred grams of an average chicken contained less than 9 grams of fat, but today it contains nearly 23 grams of fat? That the amount of protein in that chicken has fallen by more than 30%? That children aged 4-14 in the UK get 16-17% of their daily calories from processed sugars? That the World Health Organisation's recommended limit is 10%? That industrialised farming uses 50 times more energy than traditional farming? That livestock farming creates greater carbon emissions than all of global transport put together? That some salmon farmers dye their fish? That sugar could be as bad for you as tobacco? That you might have been better off eating butter rather than margarine all along? That industrial processing removes much of the nutritional value of the food it produces? That by changing our diets we could reduce cancers by a third? That corporations are shaping our bodies, our minds and the future of the planet? Eat Your Heart Out explains how big business took control of what we eat - and why so few of us even noticed. Crossing the globe in search of agribusiness's darkest secrets, Felicity Lawrence uncovers some startling facts and stomach-churning figures. 4.5 out of 5 based on 3 reviews
Eat Your Heart Out: Why the Food Business Is Bad for the Planet and Your Health

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre Society, Politics & Philosophy, Food & Drink
Format Paperback
Pages 352
RRP £8.99
Date of Publication June 2008
ISBN 978-0141026015
Publisher Penguin
 

Why is it...That almost all the processed foods we eat contain the same handful of ingredients? That these handful of ingredients are produced by only a handful of multi-nationals? That some cereals contain more salt per serving than a packet of crisps? That served with milk, sugar and raisins, some cardboard packets have been said to be more nutritious than the cereal they contain? That there are half the number of dairy farms in the UK than there were 10 years ago? That over the same period the turnover of the top 20 global dairy corporations has increased by 60%? That over 60% of all processed foods in Britain contain soya? That the UK government's Committee on the Toxicity of Food judged that eating soya could have hormone-disrupting effects? That in 1970, a hundred grams of an average chicken contained less than 9 grams of fat, but today it contains nearly 23 grams of fat? That the amount of protein in that chicken has fallen by more than 30%? That children aged 4-14 in the UK get 16-17% of their daily calories from processed sugars? That the World Health Organisation's recommended limit is 10%? That industrialised farming uses 50 times more energy than traditional farming? That livestock farming creates greater carbon emissions than all of global transport put together? That some salmon farmers dye their fish? That sugar could be as bad for you as tobacco? That you might have been better off eating butter rather than margarine all along? That industrial processing removes much of the nutritional value of the food it produces? That by changing our diets we could reduce cancers by a third? That corporations are shaping our bodies, our minds and the future of the planet? Eat Your Heart Out explains how big business took control of what we eat - and why so few of us even noticed. Crossing the globe in search of agribusiness's darkest secrets, Felicity Lawrence uncovers some startling facts and stomach-churning figures.

Reviews

The Scotsman

David Sexton

[Laurence's] advice on how to shop and eat remains pretty much the same as it was before – "organically, more locally, more seasonally, more directly from producers and independent retailers, more Fairtrade, less meat and animal produce, more wholegrains, pulses, fresh fruits and vegetables, few highly processed foods, nothing with ingredients on a label you cannot recognise, nothing that claims to be a new or techno food, nothing highly packaged". A counsel of perfection? Yes. But taken together, Lawrence's excellent, alarming books are more likely actually to make you change the way you eat than any diet manual or celebrity cookbook could ever hope to do.

04/07/2008

Read Full Review


The Sunday Times

Alexander Cockburn

(REVIEWED WITH THE END OF FOOD BY PAUL ROBERTS) Both Paul Roberts and Felicity Lawrence...have done plenty of homework and it is scarcely their fault if a lot of the corporate infamies and statistics that smoulder angrily in their pages often have a somewhat familiar reek... Lawrence is less of a Malthusian [than Robinson] and less gloomy overall. She doesn't see any swift reversal of the downward slide, but has hope that the public appetite for organic food, linked to new forms of distribution such as community-supported agriculture, food boxes and the like, will impel shifts to the better.

13/07/2008

Read Full Review


The Guardian

Fred Pearce

It is a restless snap-crackle-and-pop ride, jaunty in places, rarely preachy, always engaging. Lawrence is a guide we can trust... Defying the conventional boundaries of her trade, she is both sensible and readable on everything from your bodily functions to Britain's archipelago of tax havens, from American industrial history to the living conditions of Italy's migrant workers... I would have liked to hear more from the people in the fields of the world.

05/07/2008

Read Full Review


©2013 The Omnivore