The Spaghetti Tree: Mario and Franco and the Trattoria Revolution

Alasdair Scott Sutherland

The Spaghetti Tree: Mario and Franco and the Trattoria Revolution

Before the Trattoria Revolution, we in Britain knew so little about foreign cooking that in 1957, most of us believed the BBC's Panorama April Fool hoax that spaghetti grew on trees. The Spaghetti Tree is the colourful and untold story of Britain's growing love affair with Italian food, originally sparked in 1959 by Mario Cassandro and Franco Lagattolla at La Trattoria Terrazza in Soho. With its authentic dishes, informal style, and its cool, modern interior, La Terrazza became the most famous and influential restaurant in London, launching a revolution in our social culture. Just as Britain's post-war generation found their own new freedoms, so Mario and Franco and their successors gave us something else our parents had never enjoyed: our own new food and restaurants. The Trat Scene became a part of Sixties folklore and throughout the decade, Mario and Franco s empire spread, while their formula, menu, style and even their design, was endlessly copied in trattorie across the country, transforming our restaurant landscape. Mario and Franco changed the way we ate out, and today, in homes and restaurants around the country, their legacy lives on. 4.0 out of 5 based on 1 reviews
The Spaghetti Tree: Mario and Franco and the Trattoria Revolution

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre Food & Drink
Format Hardback
Pages 220
RRP £14.99
Date of Publication April 2009
ISBN 978-0955789205
Publisher Primavera Books
 

Before the Trattoria Revolution, we in Britain knew so little about foreign cooking that in 1957, most of us believed the BBC's Panorama April Fool hoax that spaghetti grew on trees. The Spaghetti Tree is the colourful and untold story of Britain's growing love affair with Italian food, originally sparked in 1959 by Mario Cassandro and Franco Lagattolla at La Trattoria Terrazza in Soho. With its authentic dishes, informal style, and its cool, modern interior, La Terrazza became the most famous and influential restaurant in London, launching a revolution in our social culture. Just as Britain's post-war generation found their own new freedoms, so Mario and Franco and their successors gave us something else our parents had never enjoyed: our own new food and restaurants. The Trat Scene became a part of Sixties folklore and throughout the decade, Mario and Franco s empire spread, while their formula, menu, style and even their design, was endlessly copied in trattorie across the country, transforming our restaurant landscape. Mario and Franco changed the way we ate out, and today, in homes and restaurants around the country, their legacy lives on.

Reviews

The Observer

Paul Levy

A history of Italian restaurants in Britain would seem likely to be a very brief book. But Sutherland has put his finger on something genuinely important: the contribution of designer Enzo Apicella to the modern eating house... The pacy introduction by Len Deighton is worth buying the book for.

07/06/2009

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