Spices: A Global History

Fred Czarra

Spices: A Global History

A general history of spices from the ancient world to the present day. Fred Czarra provides an overview of major events in spice history, from the trade routes of the ancient world to McCormick's twenty-first century domination of global spices. Focusing on the five premier spices - black pepper, cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, and the chili pepper - and also relating the stories of many others, Czarra's account tracks spices' influence as they travelled through the globe. The author also relates a wide range of spice fact, fable and legend: from giant birds building cinnamon nests, to early modern encounters between the English, Portuguese, and Dutch, which resulted in the first global war. He further shows that the spice trade opened up the first era of globalization, where people and spices mixed in cross-cultural exchanges. 1.0 out of 5 based on 2 reviews
Spices: A Global History

Omniscore:

Classification Non-fiction
Genre Food & Drink
Format Hardback
Pages 128
RRP £8.99
Date of Publication March 2009
ISBN 978-1861894267
Publisher Reaktion
 

A general history of spices from the ancient world to the present day. Fred Czarra provides an overview of major events in spice history, from the trade routes of the ancient world to McCormick's twenty-first century domination of global spices. Focusing on the five premier spices - black pepper, cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, and the chili pepper - and also relating the stories of many others, Czarra's account tracks spices' influence as they travelled through the globe. The author also relates a wide range of spice fact, fable and legend: from giant birds building cinnamon nests, to early modern encounters between the English, Portuguese, and Dutch, which resulted in the first global war. He further shows that the spice trade opened up the first era of globalization, where people and spices mixed in cross-cultural exchanges.

Reviews

The Guardian

Tom Jaine

...the new Edible series from Reaktion is to be welcomed. More titles have appeared, including Pie by Janet Clarkson and Spices by Fred Czarra. Short and sweet, they should address the question of cookery. Alas, they don't... The spice book wanders almost incomprehensibly through the dense and complex history of the spice trade, ignoring how people used spices and which were the preference of this culture or that period... Writing and conceiving short books is a great art, and these are apprentice pieces.

13/06/2009

Read Full Review


The Observer

Paul Levy

...what is the point of repeating what other writers have to say about spices, if you do not even cite your sources so that an interested reader can follow up your second-hand, derivative insights?

07/06/2009

Read Full Review


©2013 The Omnivore